StateTech Magazine - Technology Solutions That Drive Government https://statetechmagazine.com/rss.xml en New Atlanta CIO Advisory Board Can Elevate Residents’ Concerns, Experts Say https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/06/new-atlanta-cio-advisory-board-can-elevate-residents-concerns-experts-say <span>New Atlanta CIO Advisory Board Can Elevate Residents’ Concerns, Experts Say</span> <span><span lang="" about="/dashboard/mickey-mccarter" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mickey McCarter</span></span> <span>Wed, 06/12/2019 - 15:50</span> <div><p>Atlanta Information Management recently announced that it would form <strong>a new CIO advisory board</strong> to work directly with CIO Gary Brantley, playing a “vital role in setting the strategic direction for innovation and technology now and in the future,” <a href="https://www.atlantaga.gov/Home/Components/News/News/12015/1338" target="_blank">Brantley said in a press release</a>. </p> <p>The board is composed of <strong>a selection of senior technology officers</strong> and other leaders from local businesses, tech organizations and academic institutions. <a href="http://metroatlantaceo.com/news/2019/04/city-atlanta-unveils-chief-information-officer-advisory-board/" target="_blank">The board scheduled its first meeting last month</a>, and it is expected to reveal more details of <strong>its goals and strategy over the coming months</strong>. </p> <p>Atlanta joins cities like Seattle and San Jose, Calif., in standing up this sort of advisory board to provide input into the city’s tech governance strategy. The advisory board will provide valuable guidance into <a href="https://www.smartcitiesworld.net/news/news/atlanta-to-host-first-us-edition-of-smart-city-expo--4020" target="_blank">Atlanta’s smart city program</a> and its thriving startup hub, among other initiatives, experts say. But the real power of the advisory board will be to <strong>highlight the concerns of Atlanta’s residents</strong>, which may not always be obvious to AIM staff.</p> <p><a data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" href="https://www.cdw.com/content/cdw/en/orchestration/digital-transformation-report.html" target="_blank"><img alt="Digital Transformation" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/statetechmagazine.com/files/Digital%20Transformation_IR_2.jpg" /></a></p> <h2>Resident-Focused Initiatives Flourish in Atlanta </h2> <p>Larry Williams, CEO of the <a href="https://www.tagonline.org/" target="_blank">Technology Association of Georgia</a>, praises Brantley’s timely decision to form the board. “<strong>Gary is a solid leader and a visionary</strong>. He’s had time to find his footing and is now ready to engage the board and find ways to better engage the community,” Williams tells <em>StateTech</em>. TAG is a nonprofit aimed at driving tech innovation and growth in the state, and it shares four board members with the advisory board.</p> <p>Williams sees <strong>a resident-focused approach for the city’s tech governance</strong> as being vital to establishing and maintaining Atlanta’s reputation as a leading tech city. </p> <p>“The residents of Atlanta are what make this a world-class city. This is a great opportunity to come at it from <strong>a customer-centric point of view</strong> and really put the interests of the city’s residents first,” Williams says.</p> <p>Referring to <a href="https://smartatl.atlantaga.gov/" target="_blank">Atlanta’s established smart city initiative</a>, Williams notes “the goal of the CIO’s office is <strong>improving the lives of the people who live here</strong>.”</p> <p>“We’ve already seen results with early detection policing, traffic management and emergency services using the Internet of Things. The CIO board needs to <strong>take into account the interests of residents and engage local companies and organizations</strong> to drive those interests forward, which I believe they will,” Williams says.</p> <p>The decision to solicit the input of a diverse group of advisers will aid in developing a robust tech strategy for the city going forward, Williams emphasizes. “I can only see it as being a good thing. The board has global thinkers that all come with a real depth of experience,” he says. </p> <p><a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2017/10/atlanta-looks-position-itself-tech-leader" target="_blank"><em><strong>MORE FROM STATETECH: </strong>Learn how Atlanta is positioning itself as a municipal tech leader.</em></a></p> <h2>Board Must Inform City IT Team of Issues </h2> <p>A resident-centric approach aligns well with the role that advisory boards of this type should be playing, according to Joseph Pucciarelli, <a href="https://www.idc.com/getdoc.jsp?containerId=PRF002560" target="_blank">IDC group vice president</a> and CIO Advisory Practice head.</p> <p>“The board should be focused on <strong>providing input into what services would be of value</strong> versus how things should be done,” Pucciarelli says.</p> <p>Pucciarelli notes the CIO’s team is more than capable of solving the issues they are aware of, so the challenge lies in the lack of visibility into some issues.</p> <p>“The shortcoming of many well-run teams or committees is that <strong>they may not fully appreciate the issues outside their four walls</strong>. A well-moderated citizen advisory board can provide useful feedback into the technology governance processes regarding requirements and opportunities,” Pucciarelli tells <em>StateTech</em>.</p> <p>Initial 5G networks have arrived <a href="https://www.usatoday.com/story/tech/2019/04/09/at-t-expands-5-g-rollout-seven-new-cities-total-rises-19/3409787002/" target="_blank">in several U.S. cities, including Atlanta</a>, and smart city initiatives are being implemented across the country. Including the voices of the people and businesses that make up the city’s established tech sector will be <strong>essential to both growing private-sector tech investment and addressing the needs of residents</strong> through smart city programs and tech governance, Pucciarelli says.</p> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/taxonomy/term/11766"><img src="/sites/statetechmagazine.com/files/styles/face_small/public/people/TristanWillis.jpg?itok=AAokvzFX" width="58" height="58" alt="Tristan Willis " typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/taxonomy/term/11766"> <div>Tristan Willis </div> </a> <a target="_blank" class="twitter" href="https://twitter.com/intent/follow?region=follow_link&amp;screen_name=Tristanthropy&amp;tw_p=followbutton&amp;variant=2.0"><span>Twitter</span></a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>Tristan Willis is a freelance writer with a passion for words. He specializes in content writing, copywriting, proofreading, and editing.</p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Wed, 12 Jun 2019 19:50:48 +0000 Mickey McCarter 42521 at https://statetechmagazine.com Best Practices for Transitioning from Windows 7 to Windows 10 https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/06/best-practices-transitioning-windows-7-windows-10 <span>Best Practices for Transitioning from Windows 7 to Windows 10</span> <span><span lang="" about="/dashboard/mickey-mccarter" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mickey McCarter</span></span> <span>Wed, 06/12/2019 - 10:22</span> <div><p>We are now about seven months away from a critical deadline for every state and local government agency with PCs, which basically means all of them: <strong>Jan. 14, 2020</strong>.</p> <p><a href="https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/windowsforbusiness/end-of-windows-7-support" target="_blank">After that date</a>, government agencies will need to pay <a href="https://www.cdwg.com/content/cdwg/en/brand/microsoft.html" target="_blank">Microsoft</a> to deliver regular security patches for <strong>Windows 7 devices</strong>, since <strong>the software giant will no longer issue regular security updates</strong> for the platform. Meanwhile, <a href="https://www.cdwg.com/content/cdwg/en/brand/microsoft/windows-10.html" target="_blank">Windows 10</a> offers agencies <a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/04/how-windows-10-migration-boosts-agencies-cybersecurity">a wide range of new security features</a>. </p> <p>Alan Shark, <a href="https://www.pti.org" target="_blank">the Public Technology Institute’s</a> executive director, <a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/05/countdown-counties-upgrade-windows-7" target="_blank">tells <em>StateTech</em> in a recent interview</a> that the PTI members he has spoken to say their local government’s Windows migration efforts are on solid footing.</p> <p>“Many already had <strong>a refresh schedule for PCs and laptops</strong> and are taking the date very seriously,” Shark says. “Most people have thought it through well in advance of the deadline.”</p> <p>What if you don’t make it? <a href="https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/microsoft-365/blog/2018/09/06/helping-customers-shift-to-a-modern-desktop/" target="_blank">Extended support will be available</a>, but comes at a per-device cost that will increase until the support expires at the end of January 2023. (Note: Internet Explorer 11 <a href="https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/17454/lifecycle-faq-internet-explorer" target="_blank">remains compatible</a> with <strong>Windows 10</strong>, but it’s the last version of that browser, which is being replaced by Microsoft Edge.)</p> <p>That’s why it is critical for state and local government IT leaders to accelerate their migration plans if they haven’t already done so. Here are <strong>some best practices for making the migration easier</strong> on you and your IT staff. </p> <p><a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/03/why-local-agencies-should-develop-cybersecurity-plans" target="_blank"><em><strong>MORE FROM STATETECH: </strong>Discover why cybersecurity planning should be a top priority for local agencies. </em></a></p> <h2>Top Tips for Windows 10 Migration </h2> <p>The first and most important migration task for IT leaders is to conduct an inventory of every PC, endpoint and piece of software (including those applications users have downloaded without your knowledge) to determine which pieces of <strong>IT equipment need to be migrated to Windows 10</strong>. Some PCs can be upgraded to Windows 10, but some will be so old that the agency will need to purchase new equipment with Windows 10 already installed. </p> <p>IT leaders need to determine how many Windows 7 users they have, how capable they will be of moving to Windows 10 and whether their roles are so critical that their work cannot be interrupted by the migration. <a href="https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/microsoft-365/blog/2018/09/06/helping-customers-shift-to-a-modern-desktop/" target="_blank">Microsoft offers toolkits and other analytics</a> to assist IT teams with this task. After that, IT leaders should <strong>select and create a pilot group of users</strong> who can start testing how Windows 10 performs and how they interact with it.</p> <p>Once all of the kinks have been ironed out and agency staff feels comfortable using the platform, IT leaders can start plans for actual deployments. The rollouts should be staggered so IT experts and hardcore beta users go first, followed by less experienced users. Crucially, you should <strong>avoid deploying Windows 10 to mission-critical staff in the middle of a project</strong>. Another best practice Microsoft recommends is the <a href="https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/deployment/update/waas-deployment-rings-windows-10-updates" target="_blank">use of deployment rings</a>, which can make the rollout process smoother. Under this methodology, each ring includes users from a variety of departments so that problems limited to one department can be seen more quickly and affect only a few people at a time. </p> <p>Moving to <strong>Windows 10 is a major undertaking</strong>, but it’s one that all agencies need to start pursuing with alacrity if they haven’t already. These tips can help get your agency started and make the migration a smooth one. </p> <p><em>This article is part of StateTech's <a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/citizen" target="_blank">CITizen blog series</a>. Please join the discussion on Twitter by using the <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/statelocalIT?f=tweets" target="_blank">#StateLocalIT</a> hashtag.</em></p> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/author/matt-parnofiello"><img src="/sites/statetechmagazine.com/files/styles/face_small/public/people/mattparnofiello.jpg?itok=qLJ1LYCA" width="58" height="58" alt="Matt Parnofiello" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/author/matt-parnofiello"> <div>Matt Parnofiello</div> </a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>In his role as Senior Business Development Strategist and Senior Public Safety Strategist at CDW•G, Matt Parnofiello manages technology integration projects with public safety agencies from concept to implementation. Working with the CDW•G team, customers, and industry partners he provides agencies with new capabilities and improved safety through digital transformation.</p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Wed, 12 Jun 2019 14:22:40 +0000 Mickey McCarter 42516 at https://statetechmagazine.com Syracuse Reaches for the Future with Smart City Plan https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/06/syracuse-reaches-future-smart-city-plan <span>Syracuse Reaches for the Future with Smart City Plan</span> <span><span lang="" about="/dashboard/mickey-mccarter" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mickey McCarter</span></span> <span>Tue, 06/11/2019 - 12:28</span> <div><p>Syracuse, N.Y., recently chose a smart city platform to operate its streetlights <strong>with a team that includes Cisco</strong>. "This smart investment immediately helps us achieve our vision of creating a growing city that embraces diversity and creates opportunity for all," said Mayor Ben Walsh in May, <a href="https://finance.yahoo.com/news/city-syracuse-chooses-cimcon-smart-132800955.html" target="_blank">according to a news release</a>. </p> <p>The partnership would help “<strong>Syracuse surge forward</strong> as the flagship smart city in New York State,” the mayor added.</p> <p>The deal follows a December announcement in which <strong>the mayor unveiled the new plan called Syracuse Surge</strong>, a $200 million economic development project to prepare his city for the future.</p> <p>“We’re taking the long view here," <a href="https://www.syracuse.com/news/2019/01/syracuse-state-of-the-city-2019-read-the-text-of-ben-walshs-speech.html" target="_blank">Walsh said in his State of the City address</a>. “As we’re going into the Fourth Industrial Revolution, that is going to be <strong>based on connectivity and the Internet of Things</strong>, we’re making a technology infrastructure investment that puts us ahead of every other city in the country in advancing those technologies. It puts us in a once-in-a-generation position to surge ahead to not only compete in the Fourth Industrial Revolution, but to thrive in it.”</p> <p><a href="https://www.syracuse.com/news/2019/01/walsh-outlines-syracuse-surge-the-biggest-economic-growth-plan-in-city-history.html" target="_blank">The Syracuse Surge plan includes</a> buying <strong>17,507 streetlights for the city to build a smart network of LED lights</strong> and renovating an abandoned high school into a regional STEAM school. (STEAM schools are focused on studies in science, technology, engineering, the arts and mathematics.)</p> <p>In an interview with StateTech, <strong>Syracuse Chief Data Officer Sam Edelstein</strong> says that taking this step is necessary for a city like Syracuse, which, at its peak in the 1950s, had more than 220,000 residents and now has under 145,000. More than 32 percent of the city’s residents live in poverty.</p> <p>“We know that the economy is changing in a variety of ways, and <strong>our people need to be trained and prepared for it</strong>,” Edelstein says. “We’re a midsized city with a high level of poverty, and we want our people to be prepared for those future jobs.”</p> <p><a data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" href="https://www.cdw.com/content/cdw/en/orchestration/digital-transformation-report.html" target="_blank"><img alt="Digital Transformation" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/statetechmagazine.com/files/Digital%20Transformation_IR_2.jpg" /></a></p> <h2>Two Early Projects Set the Stage to Address City’s Needs</h2> <p><a href="https://www.syracuse.com/news/2019/03/syracuses-planned-steam-school-takes-baby-step-forward.html" target="_blank">The new STEAM school</a> is part of that plan, says Edelstein, adding that <strong>it will be the first of its kind regionally</strong>. It will draw students from both Syracuse and its surrounding county to allow “kids to get a top-of-the-line education that will lead to jobs in the future,” he says. The building for the school, which is on the National Register of Historic Places, has been vacant for 44 years and will cost about $90 million to renovate. The project has no estimated completion date yet.</p> <p>Syracuse is also in the process of buying its light grid, which <strong>Edelstein expects to wrap up late this year or early next year</strong>. Edelstein says the city’s shift to <a href="https://www.govtech.com/em/safety/Smart-Street-Lights-Security-Tech.html" target="_blank">LED lights will save millions of dollars a year</a>. </p> <p>Owning streetlights is an attractive proposition for many cities beyond just the savings on lighting costs, says Naveen Lamba, a director in the public sector practice of advisory firm Grant Thornton. “<strong>Each of those streetlight poles has electricity and connectivity</strong>, so now you can put all sorts of sensors on them for very little additional cost,” he says. “It gives you access to so much more information based on how you pull it together and allows you to make decisions that earlier would have been expensive.” </p> <p>Edelstein expects the smart grid to notify workers when a light is out before anyone complains. He says they are also exploring ways that <strong>a connected grid could save employees time</strong>, like networking cameras to keep watch on <a href="https://www.syracuse.com/news/2017/07/city_stuck_with_run-down_houses_as_land_bank_turns_its_back.html" target="_blank">Syracuse’s 1,700 vacant properties</a>, determine when the creek that runs through the city is at or near flooding and monitor road conditions during the winter months. </p> <p><a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2017/11/3-cities-call-data-solve-civic-challenges" target="_blank"><em><strong>MORE FROM STATETECH: </strong>Discover how three cities call upon data to solve civic challenges</em></a></p> <h2>Partnerships Will Help the Syracuse Smart City Plan to Succeed</h2> <p>Syracuse already has a public performance dashboard and <a href="http://summercollege.syr.edu/cybersecurity-hack-a-thon-challenge/" target="_blank">co-hosts hackathons with Syracuse University</a>. With more data, <strong>Edelstein says that projects they work on together will expand</strong>. “Realistically, we won’t ever have the staffing to do all the work that we would like to do,” he says. Such partnerships allow others to do new things with city data sets.</p> <p>Lamba says cities like Syracuse that have a university as part of their communities can benefit from similar relationships. “A university is a city. It has housing, it has retail, it has food, public safety, parking, utilities, wastewater — anything that a city has to deal with,” he says. “<strong>It’s a great laboratory to test out a number of these concepts</strong>. When deployed at the university, they can work through all the kinks, then it’s ready for deployment in the city. The concepts are already worked out.”</p> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/author/jen-miller"><img src="/sites/statetechmagazine.com/files/styles/face_small/public/people/u--2vU_g_400x400.jpg?itok=X9PVb1Ma" width="58" height="58" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/author/jen-miller"> <div>Jen A. Miller</div> </a> <a target="_blank" class="twitter" href="https://twitter.com/intent/follow?region=follow_link&amp;screen_name=byJenAMiller&amp;tw_p=followbutton&amp;variant=2.0"><span>Twitter</span></a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>Jen A. Miller writes about technology for CIO.com. She's also a contributor to the <em>New York Times</em>, <em>Washington Post</em> and the <em>Guardian</em>. Her most recent book, <em>Running: A Love Story</em> was published in March.</p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Tue, 11 Jun 2019 16:28:55 +0000 Mickey McCarter 42511 at https://statetechmagazine.com Georgia Department of Public Health Embraces Telemedicine to Improve Care https://statetechmagazine.com/media/video/georgia-department-public-health-embraces-telemedicine-improve-care <span>Georgia Department of Public Health Embraces Telemedicine to Improve Care</span> <div><p>For residents of some rural Georgia cities and towns, it can be a three- or four-hour drive, each way, to see a medical specialist. Thankfully, through the state's telemedicine network, residents can get access to high-quality care at local facilities. Using <a href="https://www.cdwg.com/content/cdwg/en/brand/cisco.html" target="_blank">Cisco Systems</a> equipment and software, the state has connected all 159 counties to the telemedicine network. The network is used not just for doctor's visits, but also educational programs, professional development and distance learning for nurses.  </p> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/dashboard/philgoldstein6191" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">phil.goldstein_6191</span></span> <span>Tue, 06/11/2019 - 10:00</span> <div> <div>Tweet text</div> <div>.@GaDPH used @Cisco videoconferencing equipment + software to connect all 159 #Georgia counties with #telemedicine solutions. #statelocalIT #telehealth</div> </div> <div> <div>Video ID</div> <div><p>1404559172</p> </div> </div> <div> <div>video type</div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/7391" hreflang="en">Case Study</a></div> </div> <div> <div>CDW Activity ID</div> <div><p>MKT34198</p> </div> </div> <div> <div>CDW VV2 Strategy</div> <div>Collaboration</div> </div> <div> <div>CDW Segment</div> <div>State &amp; Local</div> </div> <div> <div>Customer Focused</div> <div>True</div> </div> <div> <div>Buying Cycle</div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/7446" hreflang="en">Engagement</a></div> </div> <div class="pw-widget pw-size-medium pw-layout-vertical" data-layout="vertical" data-url="https://statetechmagazine.com/media/video/georgia-department-public-health-embraces-telemedicine-improve-care" data-title=".@GaDPH used @Cisco videoconferencing equipment + software to connect all 159 #Georgia counties with #telemedicine solutions. #statelocalIT #telehealth" data-via="StateTech" data-button-background="none"> <span> <span>Jun</span> <span>11</span> <span>2019</span> </span> <a class="pw-button-twitter cdw-taboola-social"></a> <a class="pw-button-facebook cdw-taboola-social"></a> <a class="pw-button-linkedin cdw-taboola-social"></a> <a class="pw-button-reddit cdw-taboola-social"></a> <a class="pw-button-flipboard cdw-taboola-social"></a> <a class="pw-button-email cdw-taboola-social"></a> <!-- Pinterest button is in EdTechk12 theme's vertical template --> </div> <div class="pw-widget pw-size-medium pw-layout-horizontal" data-url="https://statetechmagazine.com/media/video/georgia-department-public-health-embraces-telemedicine-improve-care" data-title=".@GaDPH used @Cisco videoconferencing equipment + software to connect all 159 #Georgia counties with #telemedicine solutions. #statelocalIT #telehealth" data-via="StateTech" data-button-background="none"> <div> <a class="pw-button-twitter"></a> <span class="pw-box-counter" pw:channel="twitter"></span> </div> <div> <a class="pw-button-facebook"></a> <span class="pw-box-counter" pw:channel="facebook"></span> </div> </div> <div class="pw-widget pw-size-medium pw-layout-horizontal" data-counter="true" data-url="https://statetechmagazine.com/media/video/georgia-department-public-health-embraces-telemedicine-improve-care" data-title=".@GaDPH used @Cisco videoconferencing equipment + software to connect all 159 #Georgia counties with #telemedicine solutions. #statelocalIT #telehealth" data-via="StateTech" data-button-background="none"> <div> <a class="pw-button-twitter cdw-taboola-social"></a> <a href="https://twitter.com/search?f=realtime&amp;q=https%3A%2F%2Fstatetechmagazine.com%2Frss.xml%3Foption%3Dcom_search%26Itemid%3D99999999%26searchword%3Dvictims%26searchphrase%3Dany%26ordering%3Dnewest%26limit%3D25%26limitstart%3D10" target="_blank"><span class="pw-box-counter cdw-taboola" data-channel="twitter"></span></a> </div> <div> <a class="pw-button-facebook cdw-taboola-social"></a> </div> <div> <a class="pw-button-linkedin cdw-taboola-social"></a> </div> <div> <a class="pw-button-reddit cdw-taboola-social"></a> </div> <div> <a class="pw-button-flipboard cdw-taboola-social"></a> </div> <div> <a class="pw-button-email cdw-taboola-social"></a> </div> <!-- Pinterest button is in EdTechk12 theme's horizontal template --> </div> <div> <div>Pull Quote</div> <div> <p class="quote"><a href="node/"> We have about 28 telemedicine programs currently deployed throughout the entire state. Our goal is to increase that to about 50 in the next two years. </a></p> <img src="/sites/statetechmagazine.com/files/styles/photo_quote_thumb/public/2019-06/GADPH2.jpg?itok=q8uvDgwl" width="60" height="60" alt="Suleima Salgado, Director of Telehealth, Telemedicine and Rural Health Initiatives, Georgia Department of Public Health" typeof="foaf:Image" /> <p class='speaker'> <span>Suleima Salgado</span> Director of Telehealth, Telemedicine and Rural Health Initiatives, Georgia Department of Public Health </p> </div> </div> Tue, 11 Jun 2019 14:00:00 +0000 phil.goldstein_6191 42501 at https://statetechmagazine.com Minnesota’s New CIO Outlines His Priorities https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/06/minnesotas-new-cio-outlines-his-priorities <span>Minnesota’s New CIO Outlines His Priorities</span> <span><span lang="" about="/dashboard/mickey-mccarter" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mickey McCarter</span></span> <span>Mon, 06/10/2019 - 16:09</span> <div><p>On April 29, former St. Paul Chief Innovation Officer <a href="http://www.startribune.com/gov-tim-walz-appoints-tarek-tomes-commissioner-of-it-agency/508641482/" target="_blank">Tarek Tomes stepped into his new role</a> as <strong>commissioner of Minnesota IT Services and state CIO</strong>, replacing Johanna Clyborne, who left the position in January.</p> <p>After spending the bulk of his career in the private sector, <strong>Tomes transitioned to government in 2008</strong>, initially as assistant commissioner for the Minnesota Office of Enterprise Technology, which has since been reconfigured as Minnesota IT Services. </p> <p><strong>StateTech recently spoke with Tomes</strong> about his new position, cybersecurity challenges facing state governments and the future of <a href="https://www.govtech.com/computing/Minn-Governor-Wants-to-Abandon-MNLARS-Buy-Software-Instead.html" target="_blank">the Minnesota Licensing and Registration System</a>, or MNLARS, which has cost the state more than $100 million to develop to date.</p> <p><strong><em><a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/02/tools-new-state-cios-can-use-get-speed" target="_blank">MORE FROM STATETECH: </a></em></strong><em><a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/02/tools-new-state-cios-can-use-get-speed" target="_blank">Explore new tools that state CIOS can use to get up to speed</a>.</em></p> <h2><strong style="color: #c74037;">STATETECH:</strong> What do you view as the state’s current IT priorities?</h2> <p><strong>TOMES: </strong>As the internal shared services technology provider for the executive branch, I want to be able to sit side by side, <strong>allowing agencies to innovate with us</strong>. That intimate relationship is really important because if you’re not careful, you end up just serving as a technology provider.</p> <div style="padding: 5px; width: 299px; color: rgb(236, 236, 236); margin-bottom: 10px; margin-left: 15px; float: right; background-color: rgb(51, 51, 51);"><img alt="" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://statetechmagazine.com/sites/statetechmagazine.com/files/tarek-tomes-600x750_tcm38-382710.jpg" style="width: 299px; height: 382px;" title="“Dan" /><br /><span style="color: #939393; font-size: 10px;">Photo: Courtesy of MNIT</span> <div style="font-size: 18px;">Tarek Tomes, Minnesota CIO</div> </div> <p>There’s also absolutely a priority surrounding value and how we deliver technology initiatives across the executive branch. In addition, as is true for every state and the private sector, <strong>there is a tremendous focus now on cybersecurity</strong>. <a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/01/states-thwart-cyberthreats-farther-their-targets" target="_blank">CISO and Interim CTO Aaron Call</a> put together incredible groundwork for the state’s cybersecurity policy and how it will approach cybersecurity measures. </p> <h2><strong style="color: #c74037;">STATETECH:</strong> What do the state’s cybersecurity plans include?</h2> <p><strong>TOMES: </strong>There’s a large cultural component — educating the legislature as well as business partners so security is not an add-on but a lens everyone views everything they do through.</p> <p>I had a chance to spend a little time with Atlanta city officials, so <strong>I’m aware of the devastating impact certain cybersecurity breaches can have</strong>; <a href="https://statescoop.com/one-year-after-atlantas-ransomware-attack-the-city-says-its-transforming-its-technology/" target="_blank">last year’s incident really crippled Atlanta’s critical systems</a> for an extended period of time. Certainly, incidents in the public sector are publicized much more broadly. One can deduce that for every public event, there are probably 100 or 1,000 private-sector events — those don’t, of course, get shared because of the reputational connotations. </p> <p>Making sure you understand what the critical systems are and <strong>how you can recover</strong> is certainly a focus for us. Our ability to shorten the impact timeline and contain incidents is really paramount. There’s no finish line with cybersecurity; it’s an ongoing investment. </p> <p><a data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" href="https://www.cdw.com/content/cdw/en/orchestration/cyber-security-report.html" id="" rel="" target="_blank" title=""><img alt="Cybersecurity Insights" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/statetechmagazine.com/files/Cybersecurity_IR_stayprotected_700x220%20(2).jpg" /></a></p> <h2><strong style="color: #c74037;">STATETECH:</strong> Have you been able to enact any initiatives since becoming Minnesota’s CIO?</h2> <p><strong>TOMES: </strong>We announced a pretty large strategic directional change to how we deliver driver and vehicle applications. In 2017, the state launched a new system that was probably introduced a bit prematurely. MNLARS, <strong>the Minnesota Licensing and Registration System</strong>, didn't have all the features and functionalities a launch should have, and that led to significant issues and backlogs both to the citizens and many partners that used the system to facilitate services — deputy registrars and others. </p> <p>Our team recently released the seventh release of the solution and it now has a really stable platform. <strong>The governor tasked an independent expert to review the work</strong> that remained to be done on the project, really at the moment where significant additional investment was needed to finish it, and the review findings suggested purchasing a vendor-based solution would be in the best long-term interests of the state. <a href="https://www.mprnews.org/story/2019/05/01/walz-backs-scrapping-mnlars-starting-over-with-new-software" target="_blank">We can use a vendor who invests millions in research and development</a> relating to future versions of the software. We made a strategic decision to pivot from custom-building the solution. </p> <h2><strong style="color: #c74037;">STATETECH:</strong> What is the implementation timeline for the new solution?</h2> <p><strong>TOMES: </strong>The next steps are, together with our business partner, the Department of Public Safety, <strong>we’ll release an RFP and select a vendor</strong>. During the implementation phase, we’ll run the current system simultaneously for about 20 months or so, and then go live with the future system. </p> <p><a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/media/video/nascio-2018-why-cybersecurity-paramount-concern-minnesota" target="_blank"><em><strong>MORE FROM STATETECH: </strong>Watch a video interview with former Minnosota CIO Johanna Clyborne on Minnesota's cybersecurity concerns.</em></a></p> <h2><strong style="color: #c74037;">STATETECH:</strong> How would you say your previous roles prepared you for your current position?</h2> <p><strong>TOMES: </strong>Certainly, on the delivery side, working for private-sector organizations was helpful. With successful project delivery, <strong>the utmost priority is customer satisfaction and engagement</strong>; that taught me how important understanding where they’re going and delivering on those expectations was. </p> <p><a href="https://www.bizjournals.com/twincities/news/2018/04/20/2018-twin-cities-cio-of-the-year-tarek-tomes.html" target="_blank">My most recent role as chief innovation officer</a> underscored the need to <strong>keep people at the center of our solutions</strong>. That approach helps us both validate problems we’re trying to solve and understand the stakeholders we’re crafting a solution for. </p> <h2><strong style="color: #c74037;">STATETECH:</strong> What’s different about being Minnesota CIO?</h2> <p><strong>TOMES: </strong>The size and dimension — it involves helping to mature an organization that’s <strong>democratizing technology to provide people with a voice</strong>. </p> <p>I hope to really facilitate and promote the use of digital opportunities to <strong>change the way citizens engage with the state</strong>. That means making sure we create the right data visualization and business environment — using artificial intelligence, for instance, to lift up all the transactional data — that can allow us to see where investment areas are that we should continue to support, and how we can shift the investment of taxpayers’ dollars for the most effective possible use.</p> <p>The state has an open information portal and will continue to try to <strong>highlight how groups can share data and metrics</strong>. A little bit of that also involves encouraging and helping our business partners — including executive branch agencies, boards and commissions, public schools, and other organizations we provide services to — to <a href="https://www.mprnews.org/story/2019/05/03/angela-davis-mnit-commissioner" target="_blank">understand the importance of connecting meaningful measurements with the services</a> that are provided, so the outcomes are what we expect.</p> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/author/erin-brereton"> <div>Erin Brereton</div> </a> <a target="_blank" class="twitter" href="https://twitter.com/intent/follow?region=follow_link&amp;screen_name=Erbrer09&amp;tw_p=followbutton&amp;variant=2.0"><span>Twitter</span></a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>Erin Brereton has written about technology, business and other topics for more than 50 magazines, newspapers and online publications. </p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Mon, 10 Jun 2019 20:09:52 +0000 Mickey McCarter 42506 at https://statetechmagazine.com Review: FireEye Email Threat Prevention Cloud Seamlessly Protects Government Email https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/06/review-fireeye-email-threat-prevention-cloud-seamlessly-protects-government-email <span>Review: FireEye Email Threat Prevention Cloud Seamlessly Protects Government Email</span> <span><span lang="" about="/dashboard/philgoldstein6191" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">phil.goldstein_6191</span></span> <span>Thu, 06/06/2019 - 12:18</span> <div><p><a href="https://www.cdwg.com/product/fireeye-email-threat-prevention-cloud-with-anti-virus-and-anti-spam-subsc/5393780?pfm=srh" target="_blank">FireEye Email Threat Prevention Cloud</a> makes use of multiple techniques to <strong>stop spam, viruses and phishing threats before they invade government networks</strong>. Besides the usual anti-virus and anti-spam detection found in other products, <a href="https://www.cdwg.com/content/cdwg/en/brand/fireeye.html" target="_blank">FireEye</a>’s solution contains impersonation detection, advanced threat protection, threat intelligence and the ability to write custom rules based on the YARA script language. </p> <p>FireEye Government Email Threat Prevention is <a href="https://www.fedramp.gov/" target="_blank">a Federal Risk and Authorization Management Program</a>-authorized email security service, so state and local governments can <strong>adopt it with confidence</strong>. It simply sits between the originating servers and any on-premises or cloud-based email servers. <strong>More than 900</strong> federal, state and local agencies worldwide already deploy FireEye solutions. </p> <h2 id="toc_0">IT Admins Can Screen Threats with Ease</h2> <p>There are two main sections for administration of email security: <strong>Advanced Threat Protection and Message Details</strong>. Both dashboards are intuitive, and it doesn’t take long at all to navigate them.</p> <p>Within the Advanced Threat Protection screen, administrators can easily search for specific alerts, determine the status of a malicious email, filter specific domains or status, view relevant information on individual threats or download information to a comma-separated value file for further review.</p> <p>Users can quickly scan a list to <strong>see which threats were present in a specific time interval</strong>. By clicking on the individual alert ID, users see a summary of the alert, a hygiene analysis, and they can track the history of the alert and receive a link to relevant threat intelligence. It also reveals any URLs or attachments associated with that email.</p> <p><img alt="Product Review Sheen" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/statetechmagazine.com/files/Q0319-ST_PR_Sheen-specs.jpg" /></p> <h2 id="toc_1">Scan Messages for Threat Details</h2> <p>When someone clicks on a particular message, the Message Details screen appears. This screen contains the <strong>full details of the message and the threat</strong>. </p> <p>Users can see full header information, the automated analysis report and details, any detected malware communication or operating system changes made, and all of the hygiene information. Users can also take action on the message: release it, delete it or download a copy of it into a password- protected encrypted case file.</p> <p><a data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" data-widget="image" href="https://www.cdw.com/content/cdw/en/orchestration/cyber-security-report.html" id="" rel="" target="_blank" title=""><img alt="Cybersecurity_IR_howstrong_700x220.jpg" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://fedtechmagazine.com/sites/fedtechmagazine.com/files/Cybersecurity_IR_howstrong_700x220.jpg" /></a></p> <h2 id="toc_0">Government Agencies Remain Particularly Susceptible to Email Attacks</h2> <p>Government organizations are increasingly at risk from cyberattack from foreign nation-states, cybercriminals and rogue activists. Groups such as <a href="https://www.fireeye.com/blog/threat-research/2018/11/not-so-cozy-an-uncomfortable-examination-of-a-suspected-apt29-phishing-campaign.html" target="_blank">APT29</a> use malware such as <a href="https://www2.fireeye.com/rs/848-DID-242/images/rpt-apt29-hammertoss.pdf" target="_blank">HAMMERTOSS</a> to penetrate and create a foothold on targeted computers. </p> <p><strong>Email is still the No. 1 threat vector</strong>, but the game has changed: It’s no longer just random nuisance emails but rather targeted attacks against specific individuals, called <strong>“spear phishing” </strong>because of its selective approach.</p> <p>In its “<a href="https://www.fireeye.com/current-threats/annual-threat-report/mtrends.html" target="_blank">M-Trends 2019</a>” report, FireEye Mandiant predicted email would remain a common source of attack for bad actors, who will evolve their tactics, techniques and procedures with increasingly sophisticated security tools and monitoring. According to FireEye, as of 2018, <strong>269 billion emails</strong> are sent globally every day, and <strong>91 percent</strong> of all cybercrimes begin with an email.</p> <p>“Organizations will need to adapt their email defenses and monitor attacker techniques to improve their detection and response capabilities. This will require continued vigilance ... and appropriate security solutions aimed at detecting malicious links or attachments in emails,” the report states.</p> <p><strong>Impersonation detection</strong> becomes particularly valuable for government organizations vulnerable to phishing. As the National Association of State Chief Information Officers notes in its 2018 “<a href="https://www.nascio.org/Publications/ArtMID/485/ArticleID/161/The-State-Identity-Credential-and-Access-Management-Guidance-and-Roadmap-SICAM" target="_blank">State Identity Credential and Access Management Guidance and Roadmap</a>,” effective security measures must guarantee “identification of the information requester and supplier.” </p> <p>“This is of vital importance in an environment where phishing, scamming, and identity theft are rampant,” the report adds.</p> <h3 id="toc_0">FireEye Email Threat Prevention Cloud</h3> <p><strong>Hosted Service Type</strong>: Software as a Service<br /><strong>Installation Type</strong>: Hosted<br /><strong>Compatability</strong>: PC<br /><strong>Licensing</strong>: Subscription license<br /><strong>Compliant</strong>: ISO 27001 compliant and SOC 2 Type 2 compliant<br /><strong>Good Governance</strong>: Meets FISMA requirements and NIST guidance</p> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/author/dr-jeffrey-sheen-0"><img src="/sites/statetechmagazine.com/files/styles/face_small/public/people/DrJeffSheen_200.jpg?itok=NYs556uh" width="58" height="58" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/author/dr-jeffrey-sheen-0"> <div>Dr. Jeffrey Sheen</div> </a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>Dr. Jeffrey Sheen is the supervisor of enterprise architecture services at Grange Insurance in Columbus, Ohio.</p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Thu, 06 Jun 2019 16:18:22 +0000 phil.goldstein_6191 42496 at https://statetechmagazine.com Utah Eyes Blockchain for Vehicle Registration App https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/06/utah-eyes-blockchain-vehicle-registration-app <span>Utah Eyes Blockchain for Vehicle Registration App</span> <span><span lang="" about="/dashboard/philgoldstein6191" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">phil.goldstein_6191</span></span> <span>Wed, 06/05/2019 - 12:16</span> <div><p>Utah CIO Mike Hussey had an aha! moment when he went to the state’s <a href="https://dmv.utah.gov/" target="_blank">Division of Motor Vehicles</a> to register a vehicle with his son. The experience led Hussey to push for the state to<strong> adopt a new blockchain solution</strong>. </p> <p>“We’re always trying to make the citizens’ lives easier as they engage the state,” <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7w8eNQD5la0" target="_blank">he tells <em>Government Technology</em></a>. </p> <p>Recently, Hussey says, his son purchased a car. The only reason they had to go into a state facility was to transfer the title from the seller to his son. “I thought, <strong>‘There’s got to be a better way of doing this with better technology,’”</strong> Hussey says.</p> <p><a data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" href="https://www.cdw.com/content/cdw/en/orchestration/digital-transformation-report.html" target="_blank"><img alt="Digital%20Transformation_IR_1.jpg" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://fedtechmagazine.com/sites/fedtechmagazine.com/files/Digital%20Transformation_IR_1.jpg" /></a></p> <h2 id="toc_0">Utah Wants to Use Blockchain to Cut Costs, Improve Services</h2> <p>Blockchain had “matured a little bit more” to a point where the state was confident in the digital ledger technology, Hussey says. With blockchain, no central authority is required to authorize, verify or approve a transaction. Instead, blockchain serves as “<strong>a shared, global, incorruptible and therefore trusted ledger of economic transactions</strong>. It is controlled equally by all who wish to participate and transparent, yet private,” according to <a href="https://www.nascio.org/Portals/0/Publications/Documents/2017/NASCIO Blockchains in State Government.pdf" target="_blank">a 2017 National Association of State Chief Information Officers report</a>.</p> <p>The Beehive State is looking to create a blockchain platform “that will allow us to move our vehicle titles onto blockchain,” so that the buyer, seller, banks and insurance companies involved can all digitally complete the transaction during a title change. </p> <p>“So, we’re seeing an opportunity there to<strong> make citizens’ lives easier, to make use of some great emerging technology</strong>,” Hussey says.</p> <p>Most people associate blockchain with bitcoin or other cryptocurrencies, Hussey tells <em>Government Technology</em>. However, those are just digital assets representing money that can be transferred from one individual to another. Very similarly, Hussey says, a vehicle title is an asset that can be transferred from one person to another. </p> <p>The state expects to save money by introducing blockchain technology to this process, Hussey says. “I’ve heard from some banks that they don’t actually store the titles,” he says. “The minute they get the title, because they’ve made a loan on that vehicle, they shred them, and then when the loan has been satisfied, they request another title from the state and send it back to the individual.” </p> <p><strong>The existing process costs all involved “a lot of money” </strong>Hussey notes, and he expects blockchain will help with streamlining. “I think we can do a little better job on some emergent technologies like blockchain,” he adds. </p> <p>“So, we’re seeing a lot of opportunity ahead,” Hussey says. “We’ve been engaging some companies, and I think you’ll see some great things in the very near future from Utah.”</p> <p><a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/01/6-key-drivers-tech-innovation-government" target="_blank"><em><strong>MORE FROM STATETECH:</strong> Discover the drivers of technology innovation in government. </em></a></p> <h2 id="toc_1">States Pursue Numerous Blockchain Use Cases</h2> <p>According to the NASCIO report, <strong>63 percent</strong> of those surveyed were still investigating blockchain in state government through informal discussions<strong>, 26 percent</strong> said there were no discussions of blockchain at that time and <strong>5 percent</strong> had adopted blockchain technology in support of some state government services. </p> <p>There are numerous blockchain technology use cases, and many state governments are pursuing blockchain initiatives. In 2018, a total of <strong>18 states</strong> <a href="http://www.ncsl.org/research/financial-services-and-commerce/the-fundamentals-of-risk-management-and-insurance-viewed-through-the-lens-of-emerging-technology-webinar.aspx" target="_blank">introduced some form of legislation</a> related to blockchain technology and<strong> nine bills became law</strong>, according to a tally from the National Conference of State Legislatures.</p> <p>For example, <a href="https://www.sos.state.co.us/" target="_blank">Colorado’s Department of State</a> is now required to consider research, development and implementation for encryption and data integrity techniques, including distributed ledger technologies such as blockchain. <a href="https://publications.tnsosfiles.com/acts/110/pub/pc0591.pdf" target="_blank">A law in Tennessee</a> now recognizes the legal authority to use blockchain technology and smart contracts in conducting electronic transactions.</p> <p>And <a href="https://www.wyoleg.gov/2018/Enroll/HB0101.pdf" target="_blank">a Wyoming law</a> authorizes corporations to use electronic networks or databases for the creation or maintenance of corporate records.</p> <p>The NASCIO report notes that early applications of blockchain technology are “circumstances involving <strong>audit; audit trail; necessary record of information lineage; multiple systems or databases that must be reconciled due to recording errors</strong>; managing physical or digital assets; managing ownership; managing contracts or agreements involving many secondary parties.”</p> <p>Blockchain can be used by state and local government agencies to <strong>encode and confirm or transfer property; </strong>in the transfer of currency, stock, private equity, bonds and derivatives; to facilitate crowdfunding; to manage the lineage of land titles, vehicle registries, business licenses, passports, voter IDs, death certificates and proof of insurance; to manage and execute contracts, signatures, wills, trusts and escrows; and to serve as a secure way to provide physical asset keys that manage access to homes, hotel rooms, rental cars or private cars.</p> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/author/phil-goldstein"><img src="/sites/statetechmagazine.com/files/styles/face_small/public/people/CoMfravQ_400x400.jpg?itok=W9IAwS8L" width="58" height="58" alt="Phil Goldstein" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/author/phil-goldstein"> <div>Phil Goldstein</div> </a> <a target="_blank" class="twitter" href="https://twitter.com/intent/follow?region=follow_link&amp;screen_name=philgoldstein&amp;tw_p=followbutton&amp;variant=2.0"><span>Twitter</span></a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>Phil Goldstein is the web editor for <em>FedTech</em> and <em>StateTech</em>. Besides keeping up with the latest in technology trends, he is also an avid lover of the New York Yankees, poetry, photography, traveling and escaping humidity.</p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Wed, 05 Jun 2019 16:16:08 +0000 phil.goldstein_6191 42491 at https://statetechmagazine.com How to Manage End of Support for SQL Server 2008 and Windows Server 2008 https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/06/how-manage-end-support-sql-server-2008-and-windows-server-2008 <span>How to Manage End of Support for SQL Server 2008 and Windows Server 2008 </span> <span><span lang="" about="/dashboard/philgoldstein6191" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">phil.goldstein_6191</span></span> <span>Tue, 06/04/2019 - 09:13</span> <div><p>Two major deadlines have been looming for agencies that use older versions of popular <a href="https://www.cdwg.com/content/cdwg/en/brand/microsoft.html" target="_blank">Microsoft</a> products. <strong>SQL Server 2008 and SQL Server 2008 R2</strong> <a href="https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/sql-server/sql-server-2008" target="_blank">reach their end of support on July 9</a>. <strong>Windows Server 2008 and Windows Server 2008 R2</strong> will hit their deadline six months later, <a href="https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4456235/end-of-support-for-windows-server-2008-and-windows-server-2008-r2" target="_blank">on Jan. 14, 2020</a>. </p> <p>With these deadlines, agencies using these products<strong> should already have made progress on their migration strategies</strong>. Fortunately, there are several options available to resolve the challenges involved, depending upon the circumstances facing each agency and each workload. Let’s take a look at the possibilities.</p> <p><a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/03/offsite-data-storage-helps-local-agencies-disaster-recovery" target="_blank"><em><strong>MORE FROM STATETECH: </strong>Find out how offsite data storage helps local agencies with disaster recovery.</em></a></p> <h2 id="toc_0">Ignoring End of Life Is Not an Option</h2> <p>First, and most importantly, <strong>doing nothing is not a viable option</strong>. After the end of support, Microsoft will no longer provide standard support for these products. In addition to not supporting customers with issues, there is a more serious security impact: Microsoft will<strong> no longer release security updates for these products through the automatic updating process</strong>. That means that customers will be vulnerable to any new security issues identified after the EOS, with very few options for remediating the problem. That’s an unacceptable level of risk for almost any application.</p> <p> </p> <h2 id="toc_1">Extensions Buy Time for SQL Server and Windows Server 2008 Users</h2> <p>The simplest option is to buy a way out of the problem.<strong> Push the deadline by up to three years by purchasing Extended Security Updates from Microsoft.</strong> This option is available only to customers using SQL Server or Windows Server with an active subscription to the Software Assurance licensing program. Customers purchasing Extended Security Updates may do so in one-year increments for up to three years before reaching the final deadline. </p> <p>It’s important to note that, while this addresses the immediate issue,<strong> it’s simply kicking the can down the road</strong>. When the final deadlines approach in 2022 and 2023, customers will need to migrate to a more current version of Windows and/or SQL Server.</p> <p><a data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" href="https://www.cdw.com/content/cdw/en/orchestration/hybrid-cloud-infrastructure-report.html" target="_blank"><img alt="IT%20Infrastructure_IR_1%20(2)_0.jpg" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://fedtechmagazine.com/sites/fedtechmagazine.com/files/IT%20Infrastructure_IR_1%20(2)_0.jpg" /></a></p> <h2 id="toc_2">Azure Virtual Machines Provide Some Help</h2> <p>Microsoft offers free Extended Security Updates to customers running Windows and SQL Server 2008 in the cloud using <a href="https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/services/virtual-machines/" target="_blank">Azure Virtual Machines</a>. This is <strong>essentially the same approach as purchasing extended update</strong>s for use on-premises but without the cost of the purchase.</p> <p>This option isn’t the quickest approach because it involves the heavy lifting of moving workloads to the cloud. It also isn’t the most effective approach, because it also simply postpones the inevitable. However, it may be a reasonable option for agencies that are already planning to move to the cloud and face operational issues that prevent upgrades before the deadline. </p> <h2 id="toc_3">Upgrade to Windows Server 2016 and SQL Server 2017 </h2> <p>The most effective solution is to <strong>upgrade to more recent versions of these products</strong>: <a href="https://www.cdwg.com/search/?key=Windows%20Server%202016&amp;searchscope=all&amp;sr=1" target="_blank">Windows Server 2016</a> and <a href="https://www.cdwg.com/search/?key=SQL%20Server%202017&amp;searchscope=all&amp;sr=1" target="_blank">SQL Server 2017</a>. Agencies should find that most of these upgrades won’t negatively impact functionality, but all production deployments should <strong>go through a standard testing and change management process</strong>. Upgrading installations resolves the immediate issue and avoids postponing the inevitable. Microsoft’s standard support policy is to offer software updates for 10 years following a product’s release, so agencies upgrading now won’t face another upgrade deadline until 2026.</p> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/author/mike-chapple"><img src="/sites/statetechmagazine.com/files/styles/face_small/public/mike_chapple_updated.jpg?itok=PSiizevj" width="58" height="58" alt="" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/author/mike-chapple"> <div>Mike Chapple</div> </a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>Mike Chapple is associate teaching professor of IT, analytics and operations at the University of Notre Dame. </p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Tue, 04 Jun 2019 13:13:06 +0000 phil.goldstein_6191 42486 at https://statetechmagazine.com Connecticut Plans to Adopt Interagency Data Management System https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/06/connecticut-plans-adopt-interagency-data-management-system <span>Connecticut Plans to Adopt Interagency Data Management System</span> <span><span lang="" about="/dashboard/philgoldstein6191" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">phil.goldstein_6191</span></span> <span>Mon, 06/03/2019 - 13:54</span> <div><p>Connecticut Gov. Ned Lamont <a href="https://portal.ct.gov/-/media/OPM/Budget/2020_2021_Biennial_Budget/Gov-Lamont-FY20---FY21-Budget-Presentation-2-20-19.pdf?la=en" target="_blank">has vowed</a> to make the Nutmeg State home to the country’s first “<a href="https://statescoop.com/connecticut-takes-first-steps-in-all-digital-government-initiative/" target="_blank">all-digital government</a>” through the digitization of government services and streamlining of procurement processes. One of the ways he proposes to get there is through better data management. </p> <p>In April, Lamont, a former telecommunications executive, unveiled his vision of a<strong> data-driven government to cut costs, improve services make government more user-friendly</strong>. A central element of the plan is an interagency data and performance management system, which the governor’s office claims <a href="https://portal.ct.gov/Office-of-the-Governor/News/Press-Releases/2019/04-2019/Governor-Lamont-Launches-Statewide-Performance-and-Results-Agenda" target="_blank">in a press release</a> will “bring private-sector discipline and customer focus to the mission of government.”</p> <p>The performance management system will “introduce clear priorities and align agency efforts” around a wide variety of policy areas, <strong>including jobs and the economy, child and family success, transportation, and community vitality</strong>, according to the release. The performance management system will be housed within the state’s Office of Policy and Management and will be managed in close collaboration with the governor’s office. </p> <p>Lamont named David Wilkinson, who has been the commissioner of the Connecticut Office of Early Childhood for two years, as the state’s first chief performance officer. He has been charged with working to enhance cross-agency data sharing in ways that that <strong>“increase efficiencies and generate value,” </strong>according to the governor’s office. </p> <p><a data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" href="https://www.cdw.com/content/cdw/en/orchestration/digital-transformation-report.html" target="_blank"><img alt="Digital%20Transformation_IR_1.jpg" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://fedtechmagazine.com/sites/fedtechmagazine.com/files/Digital%20Transformation_IR_1.jpg" /></a></p> <h2 id="toc_0">Connecticut Aims to Harness Data to Improve Services</h2> <p>It is unclear which specific technologies will underpin the new system, though it is likely going to include data analytics capabilities and potentially artificial intelligence.</p> <p>The desired end result is a suite of <strong>citizen services that are more user-friendly and a government that is easier to interact with</strong> than before. Connecticut also wants to make services more efficient, both in how government workers spend time and where the state invests money. </p> <p>As in other states, Connecticut residents currently interact with the government in myriad ways, from renewing a driver’s license to enrolling in programs or starting a business. Lamont envisions a shift toward “simple web-based interactions” that “will begin to replace redundant requests and standing in line.” </p> <p>The state also wants to <strong>link data from different sources to drive savings</strong>. For example, Lamont’s office notes, individuals experiencing homelessness who have severe mental health challenges can revolve in and out of jails and emergency rooms, which not only costs the state money but can lead to unfortunate outcomes for the individuals involved. </p> <p>“By linking jail and emergency room data, the state can reveal the portion of homeless population for which supportive housing would yield savings to the state and better results for our most vulnerable,” the release notes. </p> <p>Similarly, state agencies involved in child care, housing and transportation can collaborate and <strong>share data so that low-income parents can travel to and complete job training programs</strong>, which, in the long run, will reduce state expenditures on welfare benefits. </p> <p>“I think that Connecticut is taking an approach that’s unlike any other state,” <a href="https://www.govtech.com/people/Connecticut-Names-States-First-Chief-Performance-Officer.html" target="_blank">Wilkinson tells <em>Government Technology</em></a>. “So we are not only launching a performance management system, but also buttressing that with, I think, a really exciting approach to digital transformation and data and procurement policy.”</p> <p>Wilkerson will also move to<strong> create a “digital front door” </strong>to help deliver streamlined online services. “Our residents expect excellent services online and our government hasn’t really kept up,” he says.</p> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/author/phil-goldstein"><img src="/sites/statetechmagazine.com/files/styles/face_small/public/people/CoMfravQ_400x400.jpg?itok=W9IAwS8L" width="58" height="58" alt="Phil Goldstein" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/author/phil-goldstein"> <div>Phil Goldstein</div> </a> <a target="_blank" class="twitter" href="https://twitter.com/intent/follow?region=follow_link&amp;screen_name=philgoldstein&amp;tw_p=followbutton&amp;variant=2.0"><span>Twitter</span></a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>Phil Goldstein is the web editor for <em>FedTech</em> and <em>StateTech</em>. Besides keeping up with the latest in technology trends, he is also an avid lover of the New York Yankees, poetry, photography, traveling and escaping humidity.</p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Mon, 03 Jun 2019 17:54:07 +0000 phil.goldstein_6191 42481 at https://statetechmagazine.com Smart Cities Fuel Traffic Light Boom to Gather Congestion Data https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/05/smart-cities-fuel-traffic-light-boom-gather-congestion-data <span>Smart Cities Fuel Traffic Light Boom to Gather Congestion Data</span> <span><span lang="" about="/dashboard/philgoldstein6191" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">phil.goldstein_6191</span></span> <span>Thu, 05/30/2019 - 08:30</span> <div><p>Smart cities deploying technologies are seeing results, particularly when they plan ahead for the augmentation of traditional tech with smart solutions.</p> <p>Often, cities find success when they can <strong>incorporate sensors into legacy assets</strong>, thus maintaining a physical technology footprint while extending the capabilities of that technology to collect data. For example, smart cities are seeing tremendous growth in smart traffic solutions, whereby traffic signals become smart signals with the addition of sensors that can detect the flow of traffic and adjust patterns based on the density of vehicles.</p> <p>Smart city technology solutions intended to ease bad traffic will generate<strong> $4.4 billion</strong> in revenue in 2023, up from <strong>$2 billion</strong> in 2019, <a href="https://www.juniperresearch.com/press/press-releases/smart-city-traffic-technology-revenues-more-than" target="_blank">projects</a> Juniper Research. <a href="http://www.netimperative.com/2019/05/smart-cities-traffic-solutions-to-more-than-double-revenue-in-four-years-time-report/" target="_blank">According to Netimperative</a>, North America is leading the way thanks to <strong>“a strong prevalence for technology deployment over policy-driven solutions to lower traffic congestion.”</strong></p> <p>“These solutions typically use sensors in combination with machine learning software algorithms to dynamically alter traffic light phasing according to traffic levels; smoothing urban traffic flows,” Netimperative says.</p> <p>Juniper identifies San Francisco and Portland, Ore., as leading U.S. cities in smart traffic management.</p> <p><a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2017/12/intelligent-transportation-systems-save-cents-main-street" target="_blank"><em><strong>MORE FROM STATETECH:</strong> Find out how intelligent transportation systems save cities money.</em></a></p> <h2 id="toc_0">Sensors Collect Data to Manage Traffic Flow</h2> <p><a href="https://moneywise.com/a/do-you-live-in-a-smart-city" target="_blank">Moneywise says</a> San Francisco is piloting some of the "coolest smart tech today."</p> <p>In 2019, <a href="http://walkfriendly.org/" target="_blank">Walk Friendly Communities</a> recognized San Francisco with a platinum award for walkability. That was quite a turnaround for city that faced “notorious congestion,” Moneywise says.</p> <p>“New initiatives include sensors that give buses priority at traffic lights, smart parking meters that change pricing based on demand and an app-based payment system for transit riders,” the publication adds, describing some of the smart city tech.</p> <p>Incorporating cameras into the traffic signals or using them in conjunction with the lights <strong>helps smart cities to track the flow of traffic and adjust lights accordingly.</strong></p> <p>“With hundreds of cameras and other sensors on its streets, Santa Clara County, Calif., can supply real-time data to its Traffic Management Center. <strong>That data is sent to cloud computing for analysis</strong>, which then informs any number of minor tweaks to the timing of some 130 signals,” <a href="https://www.govtech.com/fs/infrastructure/Santa-Clara-County-Redefines-Street-Smart.html" target="_blank"><em>Government Technology</em> reports</a>.</p> <p><a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/02/why-connected-intersections-are-backbones-smart-cities" target="_blank"><em><strong>MORE FROM STATETECH: </strong>Find out why connected intersections are the backbones of smart cities. </em></a></p> <h2 id="toc_1">Legacy Assets Extend Capabilities Through Internet of Things</h2> <p>As part of Portland's Smart City PDX initiative, <a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2018/07/portland-turns-smart-sensors-enhance-traffic-safety">the city last year installed</a> roughly <strong>200 sensors on lights in part to support traffic managemen</strong>t. </p> <p>"The Traffic Sensor Safety Project, for a price tag of just over <strong>$1 million</strong>, represents the first major milestone for the Smart City PDX initiative. It relies on GE's Current CityIQ sensors, which are powered with <a href="https://www.cdwg.com/content/cdwg/en/brand/intel-datacenter.html" target="_blank">Intel</a> IoT technology and use <a href="https://www.cdwg.com/search/?b=cwt" target="_blank">AT&amp;T</a> as the data carrier. GE, Intel and AT&amp;T have already worked together to deploy smart streetlight sensors in San Diego," <a href="https://www.zdnet.com/article/portland-kicks-off-smart-city-initiative-with-traffic-sensor-safety-project/" target="_blank">ZDNet says</a>.</p> <p>The city of Las Vegas also has been testing cameras, sensors and other devices on the Internet of Things to manage vehicle and pedestrian traffic.</p> <p>“At the intersection of Main and Clark in front of City Hall, devices hang from a traffic signal like so many koalas on a trunk. <strong>A motion-detecting camera, LiDar scanner, infrared sensor, weather probe, and sound detector </strong>variously measure pedestrian and traffic counts, air quality, odd noises, and vehicles turning in the wrong direction,” <a href="https://www.citylab.com/solutions/2019/02/las-vegas-smart-city-technology-surveillance-data-privacy/583474/" target="_blank">CityLab reports</a>. </p> <p>Companies like <a href="https://www.cdwg.com/content/cdwg/en/brand/hitachi.html?enkwrd=Hitachi" target="_blank">Hitachi</a> and <a href="https://www.cdwg.com/content/cdwg/en/brand/cisco.html?" target="_blank">Cisco</a> support the Las Vegas effort. Meanwhile, <a href="https://www.cdwg.com/content/cdwg/en/brand/microsoft.html?" target="_blank">Microsoft</a> machine-learning software scans surrounding areas for trash or graffiti that might require deployment of a cleaning crew.</p> <p>As smart cities continue to get smarter, they will extend their capabilities through recapitalizing or building upon existing infrastructure to support smart solutions.</p> <p><em>This article is part of </em>StateTech<em>'s <a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/citizen">CITizen blog series</a>. Please join the discussion on Twitter by using the <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/statelocalIT?f=tweets">#StateLocalIT</a> hashtag.</em></p> <p><em><a data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" href="https://statetechmagazine.com/citizen" target="_blank"><img alt="CITizen_blog_cropped_0.jpg" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://statetechmagazine.com/sites/statetechmagazine.com/files/CITizen_blog_cropped_0.jpg" /></a></em></p> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/author/matt-parnofiello"><img src="/sites/statetechmagazine.com/files/styles/face_small/public/people/mattparnofiello.jpg?itok=qLJ1LYCA" width="58" height="58" alt="Matt Parnofiello" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/author/matt-parnofiello"> <div>Matt Parnofiello</div> </a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>In his role as Senior Business Development Strategist and Senior Public Safety Strategist at CDW•G, Matt Parnofiello manages technology integration projects with public safety agencies from concept to implementation. Working with the CDW•G team, customers, and industry partners he provides agencies with new capabilities and improved safety through digital transformation.</p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Thu, 30 May 2019 12:30:44 +0000 phil.goldstein_6191 42471 at https://statetechmagazine.com