StateTech Magazine - Technology Solutions That Drive Government https://statetechmagazine.com/rss.xml en How Local Governments Can Overcome IT Hiring Challenges https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/05/how-local-governments-can-overcome-it-hiring-challenges <span>How Local Governments Can Overcome IT Hiring Challenges</span> <span><span lang="" about="/dashboard/philgoldstein6191" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">phil.goldstein_6191</span></span> <span>Tue, 05/21/2019 - 13:24</span> <div><p>While it’s well-known that the federal government often faces hurdles in hiring for IT roles, <a href="https://fedtechmagazine.com/article/2018/11/agencies-should-think-creatively-find-cybersecurity-pros" target="_blank">especially in cybersecurity</a>, the same is true for local governments as well. </p> <p>According to <a href="https://www.pti.org/civicax/inc/blobfetch.aspx?BlobID=23041" target="_blank">an infographic based on survey data from the Public Technology Institute</a> and CompTIA, <strong>salary constraints and a lack of qualified applicants </strong>are the top two barriers to attracting and hiring new IT staff. Also cited were <strong>protracted steps in the hiring process and security or background checks</strong>.</p> <p><a href="https://statescoop.com/salary-constraints-lack-of-qualified-applicants-top-local-government-it-workforce-woes/" target="_blank">As StateScoop reports</a>, the infographic uses survey data PTI gathered in January and February to showcase trends in the local government workforce. The group says the survey was designed to “identify some of the issues affecting the local government IT work environment, for both the IT executive and the IT operation.” </p> <p>These issues will become more pressing as local government IT teams shed retiring workers. About <strong>16 percent</strong> of respondents said that between <strong>10 and 25 percent</strong> of their current IT staff will retire within the next two years, while <strong>78 percent </strong>reported that up to<strong> 10 percent </strong>of their staffs are expected to soon retire.</p> <p>The survey data underscores the depths of the challenges that local governments face, but there are ways that they can overcome them, according to PTI Executive Director Alan Shark. Local government agencies need to <strong>enhance technology training, do a better job of selling the public service aspect of government IT work</strong> and offer more flexibility with job titles and how employees’ work weeks are structured. </p> <p><a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/05/nascio-midyear-2019-how-get-more-women-state-government-cybersecurity" target="_blank"><em><strong>MORE FROM STATETECH: </strong>Discover how to get more women into government cybersecurity roles. </em></a></p> <h2 id="toc_0">Local Governments Must Get Creative to Hire IT Pros</h2> <p>According to the survey, <strong>52 percent </strong>of respondents said it was “somewhat difficult” and <strong>40 percent</strong> said it was “very difficult” to find and hire IT staff with the right mix of skills to “make a good addition to the IT team.” </p> <p>While conducting interviews, the skill sets IT executives identified as most lacking in job applicants were an understanding of what government does (in terms of services and as an organization) and the role of the IT department, as well as emotional intelligence and oral, written and technical skills.</p> <p>Meanwhile,<strong> 54 percent </strong>of survey respondents said that IT department education and training was “limited or nonexistent.”</p> <p>Shark tells <em>StateTech</em> that was unacceptable.<strong> “Employees need to be better trained because there is less history and knowledge in the organization”</strong> as older IT workers leave, he says. Training and onboarding processes need to change to reflect that, he adds. </p> <p>Local governments can also “<strong>do a better job in selling the benefits of the public good” that comes from IT work</strong>, Shark says. In some cases, employees could be helping in life-or-death situations in support of public safety services, he notes. IT workers are also striving to improve resident services, make residents happier and make their communities better places to live. </p> <p>Agencies can also point out that <a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2018/08/wake-countys-innovation-lab-sparks-creative-solutions">they do have the ability to roll out innovative applications</a> and enhancements to customer experience for government services. “They need to do a better job of presenting the public good as it relates to technology innovation,” Shark says.</p> <p>Government agencies also need to<strong> get out of their own way when it comes to civil service classifications of certain jobs and job titles for IT roles</strong>, Shark says. Instead of a bureaucratic-sounding title for an IT staff member, “call them technology adviser, technology support manager. Give them titles that help them build their resume.”</p> <p>Shark says that local governments “have so much to gain by making these little steps.”</p> <p>Additionally, Shark says, city and county councils should make hiring exceptions and increase pay for people who have exceptional skills. “If someone has a special talent that is needed, exceptions can be made,” he says. “There are just too many people in human resources who are not willing to fight that battle.”</p> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/author/phil-goldstein"><img src="/sites/statetechmagazine.com/files/styles/face_small/public/people/CoMfravQ_400x400.jpg?itok=W9IAwS8L" width="58" height="58" alt="Phil Goldstein" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/author/phil-goldstein"> <div>Phil Goldstein</div> </a> <a target="_blank" class="twitter" href="https://twitter.com/intent/follow?region=follow_link&amp;screen_name=philgoldstein&amp;tw_p=followbutton&amp;variant=2.0"><span>Twitter</span></a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>Phil Goldstein is the web editor for <em>FedTech</em> and <em>StateTech</em>. Besides keeping up with the latest in technology trends, he is also an avid lover of the New York Yankees, poetry, photography, traveling and escaping humidity.</p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Tue, 21 May 2019 17:24:08 +0000 phil.goldstein_6191 42446 at https://statetechmagazine.com States Will Likely Boost Election Cybersecurity Spending in 2019 https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/05/states-will-likely-boost-election-cybersecurity-spending-2019 <span>States Will Likely Boost Election Cybersecurity Spending in 2019</span> <span><span lang="" about="/dashboard/philgoldstein6191" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">phil.goldstein_6191</span></span> <span>Thu, 05/16/2019 - 09:23</span> <div><p>Even though state governments and county election boards <a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/01/states-deem-midterm-election-security-efforts-success-mostly">were largely successful</a> in warding off cyberattacks during the 2018 elections, the FBI <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/26/us/politics/fbi-russian-election-interference.html" target="_blank">warned last month</a> that Russia continues to try to interfere in American elections, with FBI Director Christopher Wray calling it a “significant counterintelligence threat.”</p> <p>With that in mind, state governments are <strong>likely going to continue to bolster their cyber defenses ahead</strong> <strong>of the 2020 election</strong>. Last year, the <a href="https://thehill.com/policy/cybersecurity/420691-the-year-ahead-pressure-mounts-on-election-security-as-2020-approaches" target="_blank">U.S. Election Assistance Commission</a> allocated $380 million to the states through the next election to improve voting security.</p> <p>However, <a href="https://www.eac.gov/assets/1/6/FY2018HAVAGrantsExpenditureReport.pdf" target="_blank">an EAC audit released last month</a> found that states and territories <strong>spent just 8 percent — $31.4 million — of that $380 million</strong> through Sept. 30, 2018. The good news is that more than half of that total, $18.3 million, was spent on cybersecurity improvements. And the EAC report says that, based on the states and territories’ outlines and plans for spending their election security funds<strong>, “the vast majority of states and territories plan to spend their allotted funds within the next two or three years.” </strong></p> <p><a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2018/11/why-securing-elections-requires-little-bit-zero-trust" target="_blank"><em><strong>MORE FROM STATETECH: </strong>Discover why states should move toward zero trust security models to shore up voting systems.</em></a></p> <h2 id="toc_0">How States Are Bolstering Election Cybersecurity</h2> <p>While the total amount of money states have burned through may seem small, they have been busy <strong>investing in technology, personnel and new defenses, including vulnerability scans and advanced firewalls</strong>. For example, according to the EAC audit, Washington state put in place advanced firewall protection for the state’s centralized election system and installed an advanced threat detection and prevention appliance, though the vendor was not named. </p> <p>The state also “acquired a database storage device on the Voter Registration system that has back-up and recovery capabilities.” </p> <p>Rhode Island implemented a platform for its centralized voter registration system that encrypts all data within it and<strong> invested in another system that monitors for and protects the registration system from ransomware</strong>. The state also purchased a system that “provides real-time analysis of security threats, sends alerts if issues are detected and quarantines devices if there is abnormal activity.”</p> <p>Many of those kinds of efforts are likely going to continue in 2019 and into 2020. </p> <p>“There hasn’t been a lot of money spent, but there is a lot of activity,” Mark Abbott, the commission’s grants director, <a href="https://statescoop.com/state-spending-on-election-security-expected-to-pick-up-in-2019/" target="_blank">told StateScoop</a>.</p> <p>StateScoop reports: </p> <blockquote><p>Many of the local grants will be used to help small counties, which generally lack robust information technology resources, to beef up the information security around their electronic pollbooks, election-night reporting systems and websites that feature information for voters.</p> </blockquote> <p>“Congress should also share in<strong> longer-term funding for things like regular risk assessments and necessary repairs and upgrades for critical infrastructure</strong>, as well as grants for cybersecurity resources that are directed to local election offices, which are frequently under-resourced relative to their state counterparts,” Lawrence Norden, deputy director of the Democracy Program at the Brennan Center for Justice at the New York University School of Law, argued in congressional testimony in May, <a href="https://www.fastcompany.com/90346497/how-to-fight-2020-election-hacking-heres-what-cybersecurity-experts-say" target="_blank">according to <em>Fast Company</em></a>. </p> <p><a data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" href="https://www.cdw.com/content/cdw/en/orchestration/cyber-security-report.html" target="_blank"><img alt="Cybersecurity-report_EasyTarget.jpg" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://statetechmagazine.com/sites/biztechmagazine.com/files/uploads/Cybersecurity-report_EasyTarget.jpg" /></a></p> <p>The EAC audit makes clear that states’ election cybersecurity work will continue. </p> <p>Illinois plans to use its remaining <strong>$13.3 million</strong> in funding for a cybersecurity information sharing program, hiring a cyber navigator/adviser, “providing cybersecurity resources for local election authorities and<strong> implementing a statewide network to provide centralized monitoring, mitigation and security service</strong>s,” the audit says.</p> <p>Maryland intends to “replace and upgrade voting equipment, perform election audits,<strong> upgrade voter registration system servers and software in off-election years and enhance system monitoring activities, mitigating cyber vulnerabilitie</strong>s, refining an incident management plan and providing training,” according to the audit.</p> <p>Some large states are getting particularly ambitious. New York and Texas are undertaking what Abbott described to StateScoop as a “mammoth exercise” to conduct cybersecurity assessments for all of their counties, many of which are rural and lack lots of cybersecurity resources or personnel.</p> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/author/phil-goldstein"><img src="/sites/statetechmagazine.com/files/styles/face_small/public/people/CoMfravQ_400x400.jpg?itok=W9IAwS8L" width="58" height="58" alt="Phil Goldstein" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/author/phil-goldstein"> <div>Phil Goldstein</div> </a> <a target="_blank" class="twitter" href="https://twitter.com/intent/follow?region=follow_link&amp;screen_name=philgoldstein&amp;tw_p=followbutton&amp;variant=2.0"><span>Twitter</span></a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>Phil Goldstein is the web editor for <em>FedTech</em> and <em>StateTech</em>. Besides keeping up with the latest in technology trends, he is also an avid lover of the New York Yankees, poetry, photography, traveling and escaping humidity.</p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Thu, 16 May 2019 13:23:58 +0000 phil.goldstein_6191 42436 at https://statetechmagazine.com Smart Tech Supports Video for Police in Opelika, Ala. https://statetechmagazine.com/media/video/smart-tech-supports-video-police-opelika-ala <span>Smart Tech Supports Video for Police in Opelika, Ala.</span> <div><p>The police department in Opelika, Ala., depends on video evidence from body cameras and dash cams to investigate crimes and other matters. To support police requirements, Opelika's CIO has configured the city's network to automatically back up that video wirelessly and make it available upon demand.</p> </div> <span><span lang="" about="/dashboard/mickey-mccarter" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mickey McCarter</span></span> <span>Wed, 05/15/2019 - 10:59</span> <div> <div>Tweet text</div> <div>After collecting #surveillancevideo, @opelikacity police seamlessly transfer it to #hyperconverged storage for later use #StateLocalIT #bodycam #videostorage</div> </div> <div> <div>Video ID</div> <div><p>1668528003</p> </div> </div> <div> <div>video type</div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/7391" hreflang="en">Case Study</a></div> </div> <div> <div>CDW Activity ID</div> <div><p>MKT25519 </p> </div> </div> <div> <div>CDW VV2 Strategy</div> <div>Security</div> </div> <div> <div>CDW Segment</div> <div>State &amp; Local</div> </div> <div> <div>Customer Focused</div> <div>True</div> </div> <div> <div>Buying Cycle</div> <div><a href="/taxonomy/term/7446" hreflang="en">Engagement</a></div> </div> <div class="pw-widget pw-size-medium pw-layout-vertical" data-layout="vertical" data-url="https://statetechmagazine.com/media/video/smart-tech-supports-video-police-opelika-ala" data-title="After collecting #surveillancevideo, @opelikacity police seamlessly transfer it to #hyperconverged storage for later use #StateLocalIT #bodycam #videostorage" data-via="StateTech" data-button-background="none"> <span> <span>May</span> <span>15</span> <span>2019</span> </span> <a class="pw-button-twitter cdw-taboola-social"></a> <a class="pw-button-facebook cdw-taboola-social"></a> <a class="pw-button-linkedin cdw-taboola-social"></a> <a class="pw-button-reddit cdw-taboola-social"></a> <a class="pw-button-flipboard cdw-taboola-social"></a> <a class="pw-button-email cdw-taboola-social"></a> <!-- Pinterest button is in EdTechk12 theme's vertical template --> </div> <div class="pw-widget pw-size-medium pw-layout-horizontal" data-url="https://statetechmagazine.com/media/video/smart-tech-supports-video-police-opelika-ala" data-title="After collecting #surveillancevideo, @opelikacity police seamlessly transfer it to #hyperconverged storage for later use #StateLocalIT #bodycam #videostorage" data-via="StateTech" data-button-background="none"> <div> <a class="pw-button-twitter"></a> <span class="pw-box-counter" pw:channel="twitter"></span> </div> <div> <a class="pw-button-facebook"></a> <span class="pw-box-counter" pw:channel="facebook"></span> </div> </div> <div class="pw-widget pw-size-medium pw-layout-horizontal" data-counter="true" data-url="https://statetechmagazine.com/media/video/smart-tech-supports-video-police-opelika-ala" data-title="After collecting #surveillancevideo, @opelikacity police seamlessly transfer it to #hyperconverged storage for later use #StateLocalIT #bodycam #videostorage" data-via="StateTech" data-button-background="none"> <div> <a class="pw-button-twitter cdw-taboola-social"></a> <a href="https://twitter.com/search?f=realtime&amp;q=https%3A%2F%2Fstatetechmagazine.com%2Frss.xml%3Fdestination%3D%2Fnode%2F41981%2Fedit%26_exception_statuscode%3D403" target="_blank"><span class="pw-box-counter cdw-taboola" data-channel="twitter"></span></a> </div> <div> <a class="pw-button-facebook cdw-taboola-social"></a> </div> <div> <a class="pw-button-linkedin cdw-taboola-social"></a> </div> <div> <a class="pw-button-reddit cdw-taboola-social"></a> </div> <div> <a class="pw-button-flipboard cdw-taboola-social"></a> </div> <div> <a class="pw-button-email cdw-taboola-social"></a> </div> <!-- Pinterest button is in EdTechk12 theme's horizontal template --> </div> <div> <div>Pull Quote</div> <div> <p class="quote"><a href="node/"> Our body cameras work in conjunction with the in-car system dashcam. They are tied together in the vehicle. We built a network that would allow those camera systems to download wirelessly directly into the server. </a></p> <img src="/sites/statetechmagazine.com/files/styles/photo_quote_thumb/public/2019-05/ShaneHealey.jpg?itok=iR8nraIe" width="60" height="60" alt="Capt. Shane Healey" typeof="foaf:Image" /> <p class='speaker'> <span>Capt. Shane Healey</span> Opelika, Ala., Police Department </p> </div> </div> Wed, 15 May 2019 14:59:26 +0000 Mickey McCarter 42431 at https://statetechmagazine.com San Francisco Bans Use of Facial Recognition Tech by City Agencies https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/05/san-francisco-bans-use-facial-recognition-tech-city-agencies <span>San Francisco Bans Use of Facial Recognition Tech by City Agencies</span> <span><span lang="" about="/dashboard/philgoldstein6191" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">phil.goldstein_6191</span></span> <span>Wed, 05/15/2019 - 10:16</span> <div><p>San Francisco lawmakers on Tuesday voted to <strong>ban the use of facial recognition technology in the police force and other city agencie</strong>s, making it the first city in the United States to outlaw the tool. The San Francisco Board of Supervisors voted 8 to 1 to approve the measure; it must be voted on a second time next week, but that is seen as a formality, <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2019/05/14/us/facial-recognition-ban-san-francisco.html" target="_blank">according to <em>The New York Times</em></a>.</p> <p>The measure was <a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/01/san-francisco-considers-banning-facial-recognition-tech" target="_blank">first raised in January</a>. As <a href="https://www.wired.com/story/san-francisco-bans-use-facial-recognition-tech/" target="_blank"><em>Wired r</em>eports</a>, “San Francisco’s ban <strong>covers government agencies, including the city police and county sheriff’s department, but doesn’t affect the technology that unlocks your iPhone or cameras installed by businesses or individuals</strong>.”</p> <p>Additionally, <a href="https://www.theverge.com/2019/5/14/18623013/san-francisco-facial-recognition-ban-vote-city-agencies" target="_blank">as The Verge notes</a>, the ordinance “would also require city agencies to get board approval for their use of surveillance technology, and set up audits of surveillance tech already in use. Other cities have approved similar transparency measures.”</p> <p>While facial recognition tools have been used by law enforcement to help identify suspects, such as the man involved <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/29/us/capital-gazette-shooting-suspect.html?module=inline" target="_blank">in the mass shooting</a> at an Annapolis, Md., newspaper last June, civil liberties groups have said that the technology can be potentially be abused by government authorities and encourage mass surveillance. <a href="https://ws680.nist.gov/publication/get_pdf.cfm?pub_id=906254" target="_blank">Research from the FBI</a> has found that some demographic groups “are more susceptible to errors in the face matching process,” StateScoop notes. <a href="https://www.cdwg.com/content/cdwg/en/brand/microsoft.html" target="_blank">Microsoft</a> has <a href="https://www.theverge.com/2018/12/7/18129858/microsoft-facial-recognition-ai-now-google" target="_blank">called for new laws</a> to regulate the use of facial recognition technology. </p> <p>Aaron Peskin, the city supervisor who sponsored the bill, told the <em>Times</em> that the ordinance sends a strong message from a city that is defined by its connection to the tech industry. </p> <p>“I think part of San Francisco being the real and perceived headquarters for all things tech also comes with a responsibility for its local legislators,” Peskin said.<strong> “We have an outsize responsibility to regulate the excesses of technology precisely because they are headquartered here.” </strong></p> <p>However, critics of the ban said municipalities should focus on ways to regulate facial recognition while also acknowledging its public safety benefits. “It is ridiculous to deny the value of this technology in securing airports and border installations,” Jonathan Turley, a constitutional law expert at George Washington University, told the <em>Times</em>. <strong>“It is hard to deny that there is a public safety value to this technology.”</strong></p> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/author/phil-goldstein"><img src="/sites/statetechmagazine.com/files/styles/face_small/public/people/CoMfravQ_400x400.jpg?itok=W9IAwS8L" width="58" height="58" alt="Phil Goldstein" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/author/phil-goldstein"> <div>Phil Goldstein</div> </a> <a target="_blank" class="twitter" href="https://twitter.com/intent/follow?region=follow_link&amp;screen_name=philgoldstein&amp;tw_p=followbutton&amp;variant=2.0"><span>Twitter</span></a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>Phil Goldstein is the web editor for <em>FedTech</em> and <em>StateTech</em>. Besides keeping up with the latest in technology trends, he is also an avid lover of the New York Yankees, poetry, photography, traveling and escaping humidity.</p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Wed, 15 May 2019 14:16:39 +0000 phil.goldstein_6191 42426 at https://statetechmagazine.com Chicago Police Tap More Video Sources to Help Solve Crimes https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/05/chicago-police-tap-more-video-sources-help-solve-crimes <span>Chicago Police Tap More Video Sources to Help Solve Crimes</span> <span><span lang="" about="/dashboard/philgoldstein6191" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">phil.goldstein_6191</span></span> <span>Wed, 05/15/2019 - 09:12</span> <div><p>The Chicago Police Department now has another technology tool on its utility belt as it goes about fighting crime.</p> <p>Last month, the CPD unveiled <strong>new technology that allows them to pull video from more sources</strong> as they seek evidence in murders and other violent crimes. </p> <p>The <strong>video investigation and analysis software and technology </strong>in the Area Tech Center, housed at Area South detective headquarters on the far South Side of the city, will allow police to more quickly process and analyze video from a disparate array of sources, including private surveillance cameras and seized cellphones. </p> <p><a href="https://www.chicagotribune.com/news/local/breaking/ct-met-chicago-police-new-technology-detectives-20190405-story.html" target="_blank">As the <em>Chicago Tribune</em> notes</a>, the tech center is part of a wider effort to <strong>improve the police department’s clearance rate for homicides </strong>— the rate at which murders get solved. </p> <p>The <em>Tribune</em> reports: </p> <blockquote><p>Since opening in late February, the center has received nearly 200 requests from detectives in need of video and digital evidence processing. One of those requests included video evidence from private and police street surveillance cameras that helped identify a suspect in the March 23 fatal shooting of off-duty Officer John P. Rivera in the River North neighborhood, police said.</p> </blockquote> <p>“One of our challenges in solving crime here in Chicago has been the ability to efficiently identify, collect, download and review all the video resources connected to a crime scene,” CPD Superintendent Eddie Johnson said at the center in April, according to the<em> Tribune</em>. “Unfortunately, this has resulted in lost evidence, lower clearance rates. … This has also impacted our relationships with those who have suffered from violent crime.” </p> <p>The center was funded via a<strong> $10 million</strong> donation from billionaire hedge fund manager Ken Griffin. </p> <p><a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/05/how-pattern-recognition-and-machine-learning-helps-public-safety-departments-perfcon" target="_blank"><em><strong>MORE FROM STATETECH:</strong> Find out how pattern recognition and machine learning help public safety departments.</em></a></p> <h2 id="toc_0">CPD Looks to Get More Flexibility in Crime Fighting</h2> <p>The Area Tech Center speeds up the work of video analysis for police. Johnson said it would have taken at least three additional days to process the same videos used to investigate the Rivera shooting without the center, <a href="https://chicago.suntimes.com/news/cpd-police-technology-center-videos-detectives-murders/" target="_blank">according to the <em>Chicago Sun-Times</em>.</a> </p> <p>The center is staffed by 10 officers, four detectives, an analyst and a sergeant all trained in <a href="https://input-ace.com/" target="_blank">iNPUT-ACE’s software</a>, according to the <em>Sun-Times </em>and <a href="https://input-ace.com/chicagos-new-tech-center-adopts-input-ace-as-its-standard-to-help-detectives-solve-cases/" target="_blank">a press release</a>. “Chicago has also adopted <a href="https://www.cellebrite.com/en/home/" target="_blank">Cellebrite</a>’s technology which allows video and metadata from iNPUT-ACE to be<strong> integrated into case timelines with other digital intelligence like cell phone records</strong>,” the release notes.</p> <p>Johnson hopes to deploy similar centers in the city’s Area Central and Area North detective headquarters. </p> <p>The new tech center follows in a similar vein to the city’s Strategic Decision Support Centers. Chicago is using<strong> cloud, artificial intelligence and data analytics technology </strong>from <a href="https://www.cdwg.com/content/cdwg/en/brand/microsoft.html" target="_blank">Microsoft</a> and tools from Genetec, a Canadian firm, for the centers, which have<strong> spread to 20 of the city’s 22 police districts.</strong></p> <p>The CPD makes use of Genetec’s Citigraf technology, which “features <strong>a powerful correlation and analytics engine</strong> that instantly detects and displays relevant information from disparate systems for inter-agency collaboration,” <a href="https://www.cdwg.com/content/cdwg/en/brand/microsoft.html" target="_blank">according to a Genetec statement</a>. Those centers include surveillance cameras, gunshot detection platforms, predictive mapping and data analytics,<a href="https://www.govtech.com/public-safety/Drones-AI-Bodycams-Is-Technology-Making-Us-Safer.html" target="_blank"> <em>Government Technology</em> reports</a>.</p> <p>The tech center focuses more on using software and hardware to analyze surveillance video and cellphone evidence, and is specifically designed for detectives, the <em>Tribune</em> reports. The center is aimed at giving detectives the software resources to view and analyze such video. </p> <p>Sgt. Patrick Kinney, who helps run the tech center, told the <em>Tribune</em> that the center’s officers can help other detectives at homicide scenes by viewing recovered video on laptops. </p> <p><strong>“It saves … hours upon hours for the detectives,”</strong> Kinney said. “It frees them up because we’re the ones doing the processing for them, we’re the ones recovering the video, analyzing the video, and then providing it to them with the investigative leads.”</p> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/author/phil-goldstein"><img src="/sites/statetechmagazine.com/files/styles/face_small/public/people/CoMfravQ_400x400.jpg?itok=W9IAwS8L" width="58" height="58" alt="Phil Goldstein" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/author/phil-goldstein"> <div>Phil Goldstein</div> </a> <a target="_blank" class="twitter" href="https://twitter.com/intent/follow?region=follow_link&amp;screen_name=philgoldstein&amp;tw_p=followbutton&amp;variant=2.0"><span>Twitter</span></a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>Phil Goldstein is the web editor for <em>FedTech</em> and <em>StateTech</em>. Besides keeping up with the latest in technology trends, he is also an avid lover of the New York Yankees, poetry, photography, traveling and escaping humidity.</p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Wed, 15 May 2019 13:12:20 +0000 phil.goldstein_6191 42416 at https://statetechmagazine.com Massachusetts Pledges Major Investment in IT Modernization https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/05/massachusetts-pledges-major-investment-it-modernization <span>Massachusetts Pledges Major Investment in IT Modernization</span> <span><span lang="" about="/dashboard/philgoldstein6191" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">phil.goldstein_6191</span></span> <span>Mon, 05/13/2019 - 11:17</span> <div><p>Massachusetts could be getting ready to open its wallet in a major way when it comes to IT modernization.</p> <p>Last month, Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker <a href="https://www.mass.gov/news/governor-baker-files-legislation-authorizing-11-billion-to-improve-information-technology" target="_blank">filed legislation</a> authorizing more than<strong> $1.1 billion </strong>in capital funding for public safety and IT investments, including for cybersecurity. More than half of the funding, <strong>$600 million</strong>, would be <strong>put toward the state’s technology infrastructure needs, IT security and improving services for residents</strong>. </p> <p>“It is critically important that the Commonwealth make these capital investments to strengthen defenses against cyber threats and continue modernizing and securing our digital assets,” Baker said in a statement. “This bill will also help us to partner with local agencies and provide additional capital support to better serve the residents of Massachusetts.” </p> <p><a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/03/how-states-are-going-smart-state-journey" target="_blank"><em><strong>MORE FROM STATETECH:</strong> Find out how different states are going on a smart state journey. </em></a></p> <h2 id="toc_0">Funding for Digital Services, Cybersecurity to Get a Boost</h2> <p>The state’s Executive Office of Technology Services and Security, which Baker elevated to the cabinet level in 2017, is prioritizing capital IT projects that are reliable over the long term and deliver maximum return on investment, according to Baker’s office.</p> <p>The funding in the proposed bill would increase the state’s cybersecurity, “advance strategic IT initiatives, modernize digital and telecommunications infrastructure and improve the user experience” for a wide range of services.</p> <p>Specifically, the bill calls for <strong>$195 million in funding to improve resident service</strong>s, including in the areas of “healthcare, housing, education, employment assistance, public safety and emergency management, transportation and the environment.”</p> <p>Another <strong>$165 million would be earmarked for “strategic initiatives related to the efficiency of state IT resources,” </strong>including new human resources, financial and background check systems. </p> <p>Baker also wants<strong> $135 million for upgrades to cybersecurity for the state’s digital assets</strong>, including a new Security Operations Center. SOCs are the facilities where agency websites, applications, databases, data centers and servers, networks, desktops and other endpoints are monitored, assessed and defended.</p> <p><a data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" href="https://www.cdw.com/content/cdw/en/orchestration/digital-transformation-report.html" target="_blank"><img alt="Digital%20Transformation_IR_1.jpg" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://fedtechmagazine.com/sites/fedtechmagazine.com/files/Digital%20Transformation_IR_1.jpg" /></a></p> <p>The cybersecurity funding would also cover vulnerability testing of state IT infrastructure and statewide IT systems, as well as improvements to access security for state systems, according to the release.</p> <p>And the bill calls for <strong>$105 million to be spent on the modernization of Massachusetts’ digital and telecommunications infrastructure</strong>.</p> <p>Speaking in Boston alongside <a href="https://www.cdwg.com/content/cdwg/en/brand/dell-emc-interstitial.html" target="_blank">Dell Technologies</a> CEO Michael Dell last month at <a href="https://www.eventbrite.com/e/massforward-a-vision-for-2030-agenda-tickets-57204644632" target="_blank">MassForward: A Vision for 2030</a>, an event put on by Dell, Baker touched on the importance of cybersecurity for the state.</p> <p><strong>“[The goal is to be] really comfortable with our security infrastructure,”</strong> he said, <a href="https://mytechdecisions.com/compliance/baker-dell-massforward-2030/" target="_blank">according to the website My Tech Decisions</a>. “One of the things that happens when you don’t have a center of gravity with respect to how you think about technology is that there’s a lot of people out there doing a lot of their own things. What they buy, what their security protocols are, and all the rest. It creates a really interesting-looking house with a lot of doors and windows.”</p> <p>Massachusetts is focused on setting one set of security standards for how the state purchases and manages technology. Massachusetts CIO Curtis Wood said last week at the <a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/nascio-2019-midyear-conference">NASCIO Midyear 2019 conference</a> in National Harbor, Md., that the state plans to release a comprehensive cybersecurity roadmap sometime this summer. </p> <p>Baker also said that if the state is “doing really big projects, they have to be run centrally, and we need people that know how to run big projects running those. You can’t do those as one-offs at the agency level with a couple people that have four other jobs.” </p> <p>The state also must <strong>think more holistically about applications and look to streamline them where possible</strong>, Baker said. “There are a lot of case management software packages operating in state government, and there probably needs to be more than one, but I bet there needs to be less than 50,” he said. “The opportunities to think more enterprisewide about how to use technology generally is a new idea, and I think, over the long run, will give us much better insights.”</p> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/author/phil-goldstein"><img src="/sites/statetechmagazine.com/files/styles/face_small/public/people/CoMfravQ_400x400.jpg?itok=W9IAwS8L" width="58" height="58" alt="Phil Goldstein" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/author/phil-goldstein"> <div>Phil Goldstein</div> </a> <a target="_blank" class="twitter" href="https://twitter.com/intent/follow?region=follow_link&amp;screen_name=philgoldstein&amp;tw_p=followbutton&amp;variant=2.0"><span>Twitter</span></a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>Phil Goldstein is the web editor for <em>FedTech</em> and <em>StateTech</em>. Besides keeping up with the latest in technology trends, he is also an avid lover of the New York Yankees, poetry, photography, traveling and escaping humidity.</p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Mon, 13 May 2019 15:17:33 +0000 phil.goldstein_6191 42411 at https://statetechmagazine.com How North Dakota, West Virginia Will Streamline Cybersecurity https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/05/how-north-dakota-west-virginia-will-streamline-cybersecurity <span>How North Dakota, West Virginia Will Streamline Cybersecurity</span> <span><span lang="" about="/dashboard/philgoldstein6191" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">phil.goldstein_6191</span></span> <span>Thu, 05/09/2019 - 09:31</span> <div><p>Cybersecurity concerns are <a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/media/video/cybersecurity-threats-keep-state-cisos-night">always top of mind for state CISOs</a>. Over the past few weeks, two state governments have taken steps to put their cybersecurity and IT leaders a little more at ease. </p> <p>In North Dakota, Gov. Doug Burgum on March 30 <a href="https://www.nd.gov/news/burgum-signs-legislation-creating-unified-cybersecurity-approach-north-dakota" target="_blank">signed into law a measure</a> that makes the Roughrider State the first state to<strong> “authorize a central, shared service approach to cybersecurity strategy across all aspects of state government.”</strong> That includes state, local, legislative, judicial, K–12 education and higher education.</p> <p>Meanwhile, in West Virginia, Gov. Jim Justice signed <a href="http://www.wvlegislature.gov/Bill_Text_HTML/2019_SESSIONS/RS/bills/HB2452 SUB ENR.pdf" target="_blank">the Secure WV Act</a> into law in late March. The law creates a new Cybersecurity Office within the Mountain State’s Office of Technology “that will be responsible for conducting a risk assessment across most state agencies,” <a href="https://www.govtech.com/security/WVa-to-Open-Cybersecurity-Office-Launch-Unification-Plan.html" target="_blank">as <em>Government Technology</em> reports</a>. The law also authorizes the state CISO to create a cybersecurity framework, “to assist and provide guidance to agencies in cyber risk strategy and setting forth other duties” and generally to standardize cybersecurity in the state. That includes<strong> ensuring the uniformity and adequacy of the cyber risk assessments</strong>. </p> <p>Taken together, the separate approaches represent efforts by states to streamline their IT governance and cybersecurity operations and make IT security more consistent across state agencies.</p> <p><a data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" href="https://www.cdw.com/content/cdw/en/orchestration/cyber-security-report.html" target="_blank"><img alt="CDW Cybersecurity Insight Report " data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="https://statetechmagazine.com/sites/statetechmagazine.com/files/Cybersecurity_IR_stayprotected_700x220%20(2).jpg" /></a></p> <h2 id="toc_0">North Dakota Takes Unified Approach to Cybersecurity</h2> <p>North Dakota’s cybersecurity efforts <a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/01/north-dakota-considers-major-it-and-cybersecurity-unification-effort">had been in the works for months</a>, and <a href="https://www.legis.nd.gov/assembly/66-2019/documents/19-8091-02001m.pdf" target="_blank">Senate Bill 2110</a> aims to make security operations more efficient in a state where officials estimate there are roughly <strong>5 million cyberattack attempts each month </strong>on average.</p> <p>“This important investment in 21st-century critical infrastructure recognizes the increasingly digital world in which we live and the growing nature of cybersecurity threats,” Burgum said in a statement. “A unified approach to cybersecurity strengthens our ability to protect the state network’<strong>s 252,000 </strong>daily users and more than<strong> 400</strong> entities from cyberattacks.” </p> <p>The IT department is also required to advise and consult with the state’s legislative and judicial branches regarding cybersecurity strategy.</p> <p>“The collaborative effort on this legislation clearly reflects a whole-of-government approach by North Dakota’s leaders, enabling the state to effectively address millions of monthly attacks and identify potential gaps in cybersecurity,” state CIO Shawn Riley said in a statement.</p> <p><em><a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2018/10/nascio-2018-deloitte-nascio-report-calls-bold-plays-cybersecurity" target="_blank"><strong>MORE FROM STATETECH: </strong>Find out how state CIOs and CISOs can make “bold plays for change” on cybersecurity</a>.</em></p> <h2 id="toc_1">West Virginia Opens New Cyber Office</h2> <p>Under the Secure WV Act, the CISO, who will be appointed by the state CTO, will be responsible for developing policies, procedures and standards necessary to establish an enterprise cybersecurity program “that recognizes the interdependent relationship and complexity of technology in government operations and the nature of shared risk of cyber threats to the state.” </p> <p>The CISO will also <strong>create a cyber risk management service</strong> aimed at ensuring that state officials at all levels understand their responsibilities for managing their agencies’ cyber risk, according to the legislation.</p> <p>Further, the CISO will <strong>“designate a cyber risk standard for the cybersecurity framework,” </strong>and “establish the cyber risk assessment requirements such as assessment type, scope, frequency and reporting.”</p> <p>Agencies will receive cyber risk guidance for IT projects, including recommendations of security controls and remediation plans.</p> <p>The CISO will help agencies with creating cyber incident response plans and help them manage frameworks for information custody, classification, accountability and protection.</p> <p>West Virginia CTO Joshua Spence said in a statement that the legislation will serve as “a foundational step forward in cybersecurity protection of state information systems and data,” according to Government Technology</p> <p>“By leveraging a risk management approach, the state can ensure cybersecurity resources are applied to that which matters most,” he said.</p> <p>Spence said the state aims to <strong>create a “core cybersecurity standard" </strong>that will allow officials to make an “apples-to-apples comparison of cyber-risk assessments across all agencies within the Executive Branch.” </p> <p>As West Virginia delves into emerging technologies <a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/01/blockchain-technology-explained-biggest-use-cases-state-and-local-government-perfcon">like blockchain voting</a>, it wants to make sure those are as secure as possible. “As the state seeks to optimize government services by leveraging technology, it is important the state understand the associated cyber risk to ensure that the appropriate levels of protection are applied,” Spence added.</p> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/author/phil-goldstein"><img src="/sites/statetechmagazine.com/files/styles/face_small/public/people/CoMfravQ_400x400.jpg?itok=W9IAwS8L" width="58" height="58" alt="Phil Goldstein" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/author/phil-goldstein"> <div>Phil Goldstein</div> </a> <a target="_blank" class="twitter" href="https://twitter.com/intent/follow?region=follow_link&amp;screen_name=philgoldstein&amp;tw_p=followbutton&amp;variant=2.0"><span>Twitter</span></a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>Phil Goldstein is the web editor for <em>FedTech</em> and <em>StateTech</em>. Besides keeping up with the latest in technology trends, he is also an avid lover of the New York Yankees, poetry, photography, traveling and escaping humidity.</p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Thu, 09 May 2019 13:31:58 +0000 phil.goldstein_6191 42406 at https://statetechmagazine.com NASCIO Midyear 2019: How to Get More Women into State Government Cybersecurity https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/05/nascio-midyear-2019-how-get-more-women-state-government-cybersecurity <span>NASCIO Midyear 2019: How to Get More Women into State Government Cybersecurity </span> <span><span lang="" about="/dashboard/philgoldstein6191" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">phil.goldstein_6191</span></span> <span>Wed, 05/08/2019 - 13:11</span> <div><p>All 50 states now have a CISO, but as Maria Thompson notes, only five of them are women. At <strong>10 percent</strong>, that is not far off the average when it comes to women’s representation in government cybersecurity roles, and that low figure is distressing to Thompson, who is the chief risk officer for North Carolina.</p> <p>Along with Laura Bate, a policy analyst at the think tank New America, Thompson extolled <strong>the importance of increasing gender diversity in government cybersecurity</strong> during a panel at <a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/nascio-2019-midyear-conference">the NASCIO 2019 Midyear Conference</a> in National Harbor, Md., on Tuesday.</p> <p><a href="https://twitter.com/statetech" target="_blank"><em><strong>JOIN THE CONVERSATION: </strong>Follow @StateTech on Twitter for continued NASCIO 2019 Midyear Conference coverage. </em></a></p> <p>“You need to be able to see people who look like you and understand there is a possibility to advance in that position and own it,” Thompson said.</p> <p>Bate noted three key reasons for increasing gender diversity in cybersecurity. First, there are a lot of unfilled cyber jobs, and they won’t be filled if government agencies ignore half the population. Of the nearly <strong>314,000</strong> cybersecurity positions open in the U.S., about <strong>17,000</strong> are in the public sector, <a href="https://www.cyberseek.org/heatmap.html" target="_blank">according to CyberSeek</a>, a <a href="https://www.nist.gov/itl/applied-cybersecurity/nice" target="_blank">National Initiative for Cybersecurity Education</a> online tool that collects employment data. </p> <p><strong>“We need more people,” </strong>Bate said. </p> <p>Also, diverse teams simply perform better, Bate said, citing an enormous amount of research to back this up. For example: “In recent years a body of research has revealed another, more nuanced benefit of workplace diversity: <strong>nonhomogenous teams are simply smarter</strong>. Working with people who are different from you may challenge your brain to overcome its stale ways of thinking and sharpen its performance,” <a href="https://hbr.org/2016/11/why-diverse-teams-are-smarter" target="_blank">the <em>Harvard Business Review</em> noted in 2016</a>. </p> <p>Finally, Bate noted, <strong>increasing gender diversity “is the right thing to do” from a social and economic justice viewpoint</strong>. Cybersecurity jobs typically pay quite well, and if “there are systemic reasons certain members of society aren’t getting those opportunities,” hiring more qualified women will help address that, Bate said.</p> <p><a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/05/nascio-midyear-2019-how-navigate-role-cio-broker" target="_blank"><em><strong>MORE FROM STATETECH:</strong> Find out how to navigate the new idea of state CIO as a broker. </em></a></p> <h2 id="toc_0">How to Get More Women into the Cyber Pipeline</h2> <p>In March, New America released a report, “<a href="https://www.newamerica.org/cybersecurity-initiative/reports/new-ways-bring-women-and-through-cybersecurity-careers/" target="_blank">New Ways to Bring Women Into and Up Through Cybersecurity Careers</a>,” which was based on the findings of an interdisciplinary group of experts.</p> <p>“Depending on the source of the data, women make up <strong>11 percent, more than 20 percent, or 24 percent </strong>of the cybersecurity workforce,” the report notes. “However, overall participation in the field is just part of a complex problem. Women at nearly every level of cybersecurity are paid less than their male counterparts, and <strong>51 percent </strong>report that they have experienced discrimination, compared with only <strong>15 percent</strong> of men.”</p> <p>The report calls for three executable strategies. One is to empower organizations and coordinators that can change hiring practices at cybersecurity companies and drive up women’s interest in the field. Another is to engage with the private sector business community to get them on board with hiring more women. The third is to use marketing, entertainment and media platforms to change the narrative around women in cybersecurity.</p> <p>Bate noted that the report included the input of a woman who runs a cybersecurity camp for girls in South Dakota. “We asked, ‘How do you tell them this could be an interesting career path, but no one looks like you?’ She said, ‘We don’t talk about that.’” Instead, the camp gets girls interested in technology concepts like networking but putting them in a room with string and asking them to build their own networks. </p> <p>Thompson <a href="https://it.nc.gov/blog/2016/07/21/maria-thompson-leads-new-era-cybersecurity-nc" target="_blank">spent 20 years in the U.S. Marine Corps</a> and retired as a master gunnery sergeant and information assurance chief for the Marines, where she served as the senior enlisted cybersecurity adviser to the CIO and the senior agency information assurance officer. </p> <p><strong>“Every step that I made, I was always 1 in 10” </strong>as a woman, she said. “Unfortunately, it is what it is. But it made me a lot stronger. It made me understand where we are right now.” </p> <p>Thompson said her career in the Marines made her appreciate “why we need to be a little more proactive in getting women into IT.”</p> <p>Both Thompson and Bate said that apprenticeships and internship programs are key, and that K–12 education systems need to <strong>start teaching girls about cybersecurity at a young age</strong>. Girls also need to see that women can rise to leadership roles in cybersecurity organizations, Thompson said. </p> <p><strong>“Leadership at the top is important,” </strong>she said. “If everyone you see looks the opposite of who you are, you will not feel like that is a welcoming organization for you.”</p> <p><em>Read more articles from </em>StateTech<em>’s coverage of the NASCIO 2019 Midyear conference <a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/nascio-2019-midyear-conference">here</a>.</em></p> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/author/phil-goldstein"><img src="/sites/statetechmagazine.com/files/styles/face_small/public/people/CoMfravQ_400x400.jpg?itok=W9IAwS8L" width="58" height="58" alt="Phil Goldstein" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/author/phil-goldstein"> <div>Phil Goldstein</div> </a> <a target="_blank" class="twitter" href="https://twitter.com/intent/follow?region=follow_link&amp;screen_name=philgoldstein&amp;tw_p=followbutton&amp;variant=2.0"><span>Twitter</span></a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>Phil Goldstein is the web editor for <em>FedTech</em> and <em>StateTech</em>. Besides keeping up with the latest in technology trends, he is also an avid lover of the New York Yankees, poetry, photography, traveling and escaping humidity.</p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Wed, 08 May 2019 17:11:33 +0000 phil.goldstein_6191 42401 at https://statetechmagazine.com NASCIO Midyear 2019: How Ohio Government and State Schools Work Together on IT Initiatives https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/05/nascio-midyear-2019-how-ohio-government-and-state-schools-work-together-it-initiatives <span>NASCIO Midyear 2019: How Ohio Government and State Schools Work Together on IT Initiatives</span> <span><span lang="" about="/dashboard/mickey-mccarter" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mickey McCarter</span></span> <span>Wed, 05/08/2019 - 09:32</span> <div><p>Speaking at a leadership conference Tuesday, <a href="https://das.ohio.gov/Divisions/Information-Technology" target="_blank">Ohio CIO Ervan Rodgers</a> detailed <strong>how his state advances IT innovation</strong> with its Innovate Ohio program and in cooperation with its public education system.</p> <p><a href="https://www.mikedewine.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/Innovate-Ohio.pdf" target="_blank">Innovate Ohio</a>, an executive order from Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine, directs <strong>Ohio state agencies to digitally transform state services</strong>, Rodgers told the midyear conference of the National Association of State Chief Information Officers, this year held outside Washington, D.C. </p> <p><a href="https://twitter.com/statetech" target="_blank"><em><strong>JOIN THE CONVERSATION: </strong>Follow @StateTech on Twitter for continued NASCIO Midyear 2019 conference coverage. </em></a></p> <p>In doing so, the Ohio Department of Administrative Services, Rodgers' agency, will consider "<strong>the citizen’s journey</strong>," the CIO said. For example, an Ohio citizen may require three different logins to interact with the state and to pay taxes, pay fines and register for a driver’s license. The goal of Innovate Ohio is to <strong>bring those services together in one system</strong> where Ohioans can interact seamlessly with the state government for each of those functions and more.</p> <p>The resulting SmartOhio Operating System will “require <strong>state departments to engage in data sharing</strong> to improve the efficiency of services across state government and give the capacity to provide for predictive analytics to solve problems before they occur,” according to the governor’s office.</p> <p>In addition, Ohio DAS is migrating servers, with seven agencies remaining to be migrated. Rodgers touted the special care Ohio is taking to <strong>consider the requirements of law enforcement</strong>, which he came to understand well during his time in the Ohio Attorney General's Office.</p> <p><a data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" href="https://www.cdw.com/content/cdw/en/orchestration/digital-transformation-report.html" target="_blank"><img alt="Digital Transformation" data-entity-type="" data-entity-uuid="" src="/sites/statetechmagazine.com/files/Digital%20Transformation_IR_2.jpg" /></a></p> <h2>State Government and Schools Benefit from Partnership</h2> <p>DeWine's 2018 executive order also strengthened the state's coordination with its public school system, said State Chief Transformation Officer Kristina Hagberg. </p> <p>The <a href="https://www.oar.net/" target="_blank">Ohio Academic Resource Network</a>, or OARnet, provides <strong>the state and public universities and schools with roughly 2,000 miles of fiber optic network</strong>. OARnet also serves as the state government's internet service provider.</p> <p>The State of Ohio Computer Center <strong>colocates government and public school computers in one data center</strong>. The Ohio State University saves money with the system, and it is open to other schools and local government, Hagberg said.</p> <p>Through cooperative purchasing, <strong>government agencies and public schools can use a shared state purchasing contract</strong> with vendors like <a href="https://www.cdwg.com/content/cdwg/en/brand/vmware.html" target="_blank">VMware</a>. Occasionally, education institutions receive specialized discounts, such as with the state’s contract with <a href="https://www.cdwg.com/content/cdwg/en/brand/microsoft-interstitial.html" target="_blank">Microsoft</a>, Hagberg said. The state continues to explore how it can expand education pricing.</p> <p>Meanwhile, under Innovate Ohio, the state is addressing a cyber talent gap by fostering interest in careers through the state education system, Rodgers added.</p> <p><em>Read more articles from </em>StateTech<em>’s coverage of the NASCIO 2019 Midyear conference <a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/nascio-2019-midyear-conference">here</a>.</em></p> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/taxonomy/term/11391"><img src="/sites/statetechmagazine.com/files/styles/face_small/public/people/Mickey_McCarter.jpg?itok=tWzGOlTU" width="58" height="58" alt="Mickey McCarter" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/taxonomy/term/11391"> <div>Mickey McCarter</div> </a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>Mickey McCarter is the senior editor of StateTech Magazine.</p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Wed, 08 May 2019 13:32:15 +0000 Mickey McCarter 42396 at https://statetechmagazine.com NASCIO Midyear 2019: How to Navigate the Role of ‘CIO as a Broker’ https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/05/nascio-midyear-2019-how-navigate-role-cio-broker <span>NASCIO Midyear 2019: How to Navigate the Role of ‘CIO as a Broker’ </span> <span><span lang="" about="/dashboard/philgoldstein6191" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">phil.goldstein_6191</span></span> <span>Tue, 05/07/2019 - 16:44</span> <div><p>Last year, the National Association of State Chief Information Officers fully embraced a new model for state CIOs known as “<a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2018/10/nascio-2018-state-cios-boost-modernization-and-transparency-brokering-services">CIO as a broker</a>,” in which CIOs would broker procurement for products and services with state agencies rather than acting as mere fulfillment agents and technologists. <strong>But what does that mean in practice? </strong></p> <p>Tuesday at <a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/nascio-2019-midyear-conference">the NASCIO Midyear 2019 conference</a> in National Harbor, Md., three state IT leaders offered a variety of perspectives on <strong>how to put the model of CIO as a broker into practice</strong>.</p> <p><a href="https://twitter.com/statetech" target="_blank"><em><strong>JOIN THE CONVERSATION: </strong>Follow @StateTech on Twitter for continued NASCIO Midyear 2019 conference coverage. </em></a></p> <p>They noted that the role of the state CIO is <strong>constantly evolving</strong>, that CIOs need to <strong>maintain service and a strong relationship with the governor and legislature</strong> during times of transformation, and that IT leaders need to have d<strong>ynamic operations models</strong>.</p> <h2 id="toc_0">State CIOs Must Manage Numerous Pressures</h2> <p>State CIOs face numerous challenges that they need to handle on a daily basis, according to North Carolina CIO Eric Boyette. He said IT leaders face four key forces. </p> <p>They include a political force, which requires state CIOs to pay attention to the needs and priorities of their state’s governor and legislature. Those relationships are essential, he noted. </p> <p>Another is the market force. <strong>The technology market is continuously changing</strong>, which requires CIOs to be agile. </p> <p><script type="text/javascript" src="//sc.liveclicker.net/service/getEmbed?client_id=1526&amp;widget_id=1337090682&amp;width=640&amp;height=360"></script></p> <p>Yet another force is that of the customer or constituent, Boyette said. They want and expect government to be able to provide a seamless digital experience similar to that of private sector companies like Amazon and Netflix. </p> <p>The final force is the internal force, which pushes CIOs to figure out how to<strong> balance their staff, get new projects accomplished and maintain the systems and data they have</strong>. </p> <p>“If you look at this role, it’s really a journey,” Boyette said, noting that over his time in government, the role of the state CIO has evolved from that of an IT manager to a director to a Cabinet-level post. </p> <p>“I’m excited to see what the future looks like for us, and what our talent looks like,” he said. “How do we make sure our talent is prepared so that when we leave, the future looks great for us?”</p> <p><a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/03/how-states-are-going-smart-state-journey" target="_blank"><em><strong>MORE FROM STATETECH:</strong> Find out how different states are going on a smart state journey. </em></a></p> <h2 id="toc_1">Virginia Adopts a New Model for IT Services</h2> <p>Virginia CIO Nelson Moe noted that many of the state’s service level agreements for IT were written “back in the days of Blockbuster, when we all had Blockbuster cards, and the cassette tape.” Those contracts did not help the state keep up with customer demands and changing technologies. </p> <p>To transform, last year Virginia <a href="https://www.vita.virginia.gov/about/press-releases/new-era-in-it-services-begins-for-state-agencies.html" target="_blank">inked a new deal with SAIC</a> to manage its IT infrastructure delivery and adopted a “new services model that allows a variety of shorter contracts from different suppliers, rather than the single IT contract the state has held with Northrop Grumman since 2006,” <a href="https://statescoop.com/virginia-signs-unisys-for-242-million-data-center-contract/" target="_blank">as StateScoop reports</a>. The Virginia Information Technologies Agency <a href="https://www.vita.virginia.gov/about/press-releases/vita-contracts-mark-significant-progress-modernizing-state-it-systems.html" target="_blank">awarded contracts</a><strong> for messaging, mainframe, multisourcing service integrator, managed security, network and server storage, and voice and video network services</strong>.</p> <p>Moe laid out a list of do’s and don’ts based on Virginia’s experience. Some don’ts included trying to migrate 60,000 email users at the same time during an election season, using litigation to resolve contract migration disputes and changing all IT services at the same time. </p> <p>Actual best practices included determining how bad the status quo is in IT and the level of desire for change and engaging in long-term strategic planning. </p> <p>Moe said state CIOs should “establish and maintain immutable program principles” such as<strong> getting the governor’s support for the IT agency’s financial model and maintaining services for state agencies</strong>. </p> <p>“Expect a lot of hard work,” Moe said. “Sometimes you don’t feel like you are going anywhere.” Virginia worked with consultants to conduct market research to help it manage requests for proposals and contract awards. </p> <p>State CIOs must also maintain robust stakeholder management and governance, Moe said, which is key to getting through tough times and uncertainty. It’s crucial to get buy-in for digital transformation from the governor and legislature, he added. </p> <p><a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/04/qa-new-colorado-cio-sees-opportunities-digital-government-and-innovation" target="_blank"><em><strong>MORE FROM STATETECH:</strong> Discover how new Colorado CIO Theresa Szczurek sees opportunities in digital government and innovation.</em></a></p> <h2 id="toc_2">Georgia Embraces Dynamic Model for IT Operations</h2> <p>Dean Johnson, COO of the Georgia Technology Authority, said the state has adopted a “dynamic operations model” to enable the idea of a CIO as a broker. Johnson noted that states need to “integrate services into a single format that your customers can easily consume, easily understand and adapt to.” </p> <p>In 2008, Georgia outsourced its IT infrastructure and managed networks services, since its technology was old and the state at the time lacked the skilled IT staff to manage the infrastructure.</p> <p>From 2009 to 2015, the state undertook a transformation program to consolidate, optimize and virtualize its environment, which Johnson said was “very successful” and resulted in<strong> “secure, reliable, recoverable infrastructure.” </strong></p> <p>However, though Georgia had solved its original problem of modernizing its infrastructure and delivering services in a consistent way, the state was still not flexible or adaptable enough, Johnson said. State agencies were asking for new technologies that the GTA was unable to deliver quickly enough.</p> <p>So, the GTA<strong> decided to work with a multisourcing services integrator, which has been a “game-changer” for the agenc</strong>y, Johnson said. The state was able to go back and recompete all of its infrastructure services to create more competition and diverted its IT services for everything from end-user computing to servers. </p> <p>The integrator enables GTA to take a strategic approach to manage and oversee the services, according to Johnson. GTA now thinks in one-year, three-year and five-year timelines and is able to “be more strategic and get underneath the business needs of the agencies.” </p> <p>Having a very solid delivery system and a dynamic operations model to meet the day-to-day needs to agencies enables Georgia CIO Calvin Rhodes to <strong>stop spending all of his time “putting out fires.”</strong> The new model enabled Rhodes to <a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2018/08/georgia-unveils-cybersecurity-center-workforce-development-mind">spearhead the creation of the state’s new Cyber Center last year</a>, a massive collaborative effort with the federal government, local government, state higher education institutions and the private sector. </p> <p>“I don’t believe this opportunity would have come along if Calvin was buried under the minutia of day-to-day operations,” Johnson said.</p> <p><em>Read more articles from </em>StateTech<em>’s coverage of the NASCIO 2019 Midyear conference <a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/nascio-2019-midyear-conference">here</a>.</em></p> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/author/phil-goldstein"><img src="/sites/statetechmagazine.com/files/styles/face_small/public/people/CoMfravQ_400x400.jpg?itok=W9IAwS8L" width="58" height="58" alt="Phil Goldstein" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/author/phil-goldstein"> <div>Phil Goldstein</div> </a> <a target="_blank" class="twitter" href="https://twitter.com/intent/follow?region=follow_link&amp;screen_name=philgoldstein&amp;tw_p=followbutton&amp;variant=2.0"><span>Twitter</span></a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>Phil Goldstein is the web editor for <em>FedTech</em> and <em>StateTech</em>. Besides keeping up with the latest in technology trends, he is also an avid lover of the New York Yankees, poetry, photography, traveling and escaping humidity.</p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Tue, 07 May 2019 20:44:29 +0000 phil.goldstein_6191 42391 at https://statetechmagazine.com