StateTech Magazine - Technology Solutions That Drive Government https://statetechmagazine.com/rss.xml en As Ransomware Attacks Loom, Preparation Is Critical for Municipalities https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/10/ransomware-attacks-loom-preparation-critical-municipalities <span>As Ransomware Attacks Loom, Preparation Is Critical for Municipalities</span> <span><span lang="" about="/dashboard/philgoldstein6191" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">phil.goldstein_6191</span></span> <span>Thu, 10/10/2019 - 15:51</span> <div><p>Earlier this year, two Florida cities, Riviera Beach and Lake City, were forced to pay a combined total of more than <strong>$1.1 million</strong> when it became clear after several weeks that there was just no way to recover from a ransomware attack without paying to unlock their data. </p> <p>In addition to shelling out <strong>$600,000</strong>, Riviera Beach also invested <strong>$941,000 </strong>for new desktops, laptops and other hardware to rebuild its IT infrastructure as a result of the attack. Previously, Riviera Beach Interim IT Manager Justin Williams received authorization to spend roughly <strong>$800,000</strong> on <strong>a new security system</strong> after warning the city council in February that the old system was outdated and susceptible to ransomware and other threats, <a href="https://www.palmbeachpost.com/news/20190621/in-depth-how-riviera-beach-left-door-wide-open-for-hackers" target="_blank"><em>The Palm Beach Post</em> reports</a>.</p> <p>With all of the upgrades after the ransomware attack in May, Riviera Beach is now in a better position to defend against a ransomware attack. “Prevention is a word we have to be careful with. It’s more accurate to talk about managing risk,” says Kelvin Coleman, executive director of the <a href="https://staysafeonline.org/" target="_blank">National Cyber Security Alliance</a>.</p> <p>With this in mind, experts recommend local governments <strong>train personnel and fortify technology to mitigate from these types of attacks </strong>— without shelling out ransom money.</p> <p><em><a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/cdw_insider_registration/register-web?magazine=" target="_blank"><b>SUBSCRIBE: </b>Become an Insider and get curated cybersecurity news, tactics and analysis — for free.</a></em></p> <h2 id="toc_0">Education and Awareness Is Key to Preventing Cyberattacks</h2> <p>One of the biggest risks municipalities and other organizations face has nothing to do with the technology and practices that are in place.</p> <p>“You can put in the most sophisticated product and implement the most amazing processes, but you still have people you have to train on those products and processes,” Coleman says. “The first thing you need to look at is employee education, being able to <strong>make sure your folks have been properly trained on what to look for, things that are out of place</strong>.”</p> <p>That education and awareness should also take the form of drills or simulations such as those undertaken to prepare for fire or other emergency situations, something Coleman says is sorely lacking in the field.</p> <p>“We’re being hit millions, if not billions of times a day at the local government level, every single day, every single hour. It’s amazing that we don’t have more training that focuses on this,” he says.</p> <p>There should also be <strong>a focus on how personal devices are allowed to interact with municipal networks</strong>, which should be governed by a strong BYOD policy.</p> <p>“We’re in such an era of continuous connectivity that part of our brain says, ‘What I do for work is on one part of my device and what I do personally is on another side,’” Coleman says. “The problem is that it all interacts together, and what you do on your device has consequences for everyone. That’s where education and awareness come in.”</p> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/author/derek-rice" hreflang="en"><img src="/sites/statetechmagazine.com/files/styles/face_small/public/people/DerekRice.jpeg.jpg?itok=Mcbyl2mi" width="58" height="58" alt="Derek Rice " typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/author/derek-rice"> <div>Derek Rice</div> </a> <a target="_blank" class="twitter" href="https://twitter.com/intent/follow?region=follow_link&amp;screen_name=derekjrice&amp;tw_p=followbutton&amp;variant=2.0"><span>Twitter</span></a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>Derek Rice is a freelance writer and content developer who lives in Kennebunk, Maine.</p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Thu, 10 Oct 2019 19:51:38 +0000 phil.goldstein_6191 42976 at https://statetechmagazine.com Smart Cities Connect 2019: Philadelphia Eyes Initial Smart City Pilots https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/10/smart-cities-connect-2019-philadelphia-eyes-initial-smart-city-pilots <span>Smart Cities Connect 2019: Philadelphia Eyes Initial Smart City Pilots</span> <span><span lang="" about="/dashboard/mickey-mccarter" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mickey McCarter</span></span> <span>Wed, 10/09/2019 - 17:36</span> <div><p>Philadelphia is having a moment, agreed panelists discussing <strong>the city’s smart city plans</strong> at <a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/smart-cities-connect-2019">the Smart Cities Connect 2019 conference</a> at National Harbor, Md., on Wednesday.</p> <p>In recent years, the city hosted the Democratic National Convention and won the Super Bowl, and soon, panelists noted, it will host a national celebration for the 250th anniversary of the Declaration of Independence. But Philadelphia is also facing a crucial year in<strong> its transformation into a smart city</strong>, said CIO Mark Wheeler.</p> <p><a href="https://www.phila.gov/documents/smartcityphl-roadmap/" target="_blank">The SmartCityPHL plan</a>, launched in February 2018, calls for Philadelphia to “<strong>do more with less</strong>” and “create capacity” to re-engineer processes, Wheeler said. “It is to make sure we are taking assets, we are not wasting them, and we are coordinating with a very clear set of processes,” he said.</p> <p>When it comes to action, Philadelphia is <strong>planning ahead by setting aside money</strong> for smart city projects, Wheeler added. The city can spend up to $34,000 without a request for proposals, so the Office of Innovation and Technology can dedicate money to small pilots quickly. For fiscal 2020, Philadelphia has set aside $150,000 in budget for smart city projects.</p> <p><a href="https://twitter.com/statetech" target="_blank"><em><strong>JOIN THE CONVERSATION: </strong>Follow @StateTech on Twitter for continued Smart Cities Connect 2019 conference coverage. </em></a></p> <h2>Technology Office Centralizes View of Disparate Smart Projects</h2> <p>“We’re not waiting to do pilots. <strong>We’re doing them</strong>,” Wheeler said.</p> <p>The <a href="https://www.phila.gov/water/pages/default.aspx" target="_blank">Philadelphia Water Department</a> is using <strong>the Internet of Things</strong> and sensors to monitor infrastructure, he said. The Philadelphia Public Health Department monitors air with sensors to measure gases and hazards.</p> <p>The city takes data from <strong>a Comcast LoRaWan system</strong> that measures inputs in various areas around the city, Wheeler said. The system, called MachineQ, is <a href="https://lora-alliance.org/" target="_blank">a low-power IoT network</a> that can provide utility metering, environmental monitoring, asset tracking and more.</p> <p>In addition to the money set aside for smart city projects, Philadelphia augments its smart city initiatives with <strong>investments in hardware and networking</strong> as well as a separate project to integrate information from various data sources for analysis.</p> <p>Philadelphia plans to hire <strong>a smart city procurement specialist</strong> to augment its two-person smart city team, which includes Wheeler, in part to <a href="https://www.govtech.com/fs/infrastructure/Philadelphia-Adopts-Smart-City-Road-Map.html" target="_blank">master a difficult city procurement process</a>.</p> <p>Ideally, Wheeler would like to see Philadelphia adopt a model where a pilot program becomes part of<strong> a competitive bidding process</strong>, and selection of the pilot solutions provider becomes a yearlong interview to determine whether that provider is the right candidate to handle the program.</p> <p><a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/08/cities-support-open-data-programs-improve-lives-citizens-perfcon" target="_blank"><em><strong>MORE FROM STATETECH:</strong> Philadelphia's open data program improves the lives of citizens. </em></a></p> <h2>City Transportation Department Values Citizen Input</h2> <p>Michael Carroll, Philadelphia’s deputy managing director of <a href="http://www.phillyotis.com/" target="_blank">transportation and infrastructure systems</a>, said his department goes into neighborhoods to <strong>collect feedback from residents</strong> on projects ranging from bike lanes to streetlights. Following a “mini city hall” model, officials listen to constituents and incorporate their thoughts into the next stages of their plans.</p> <p>“We benefit by taking that information back to the lab and <strong>channeling that information</strong> to the right people to start developing solutions across silos,” Carroll said.</p> <p>Philadelphia owns a lot of its infrastructure and controls large amounts of it. The city seeks <strong>to maintain ownership</strong> of that infrastructure over time as much as possible, which fortifies its smart city prospects, Carroll said. For example, Philadelphia has exercised caution in establishing <a href="https://www.philadelphiastreets.com/small-cell-distributed-antenna-systems-das-licensing-program" target="_blank">small cell antenna projects</a> to consider all input.</p> <p>Ownership “is built into the DNA of the city. We want to leverage that to bring people in so they can be successful working with us. But we don’t lose that certain level of control that allows us to be<strong> responsive to constituencies</strong> that are at the margins,” Carroll said.</p> <p><em>Read more articles from </em>StateTech<em>’s coverage of the Smart Cities Connect 2019 conference <a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/smart-cities-connect-2019">here</a>.</em></p> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/taxonomy/term/11391" hreflang="en"><img src="/sites/statetechmagazine.com/files/styles/face_small/public/people/Mickey_McCarter.jpg?itok=tWzGOlTU" width="58" height="58" alt="Mickey McCarter" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/taxonomy/term/11391"> <div>Mickey McCarter</div> </a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>Mickey McCarter is the senior editor of StateTech Magazine.</p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Wed, 09 Oct 2019 21:36:59 +0000 Mickey McCarter 42971 at https://statetechmagazine.com Smart Cities Connect 2019: Best Practices for Smart City Success https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/10/smart-cities-connect-2019-best-practices-smart-city-success <span>Smart Cities Connect 2019: Best Practices for Smart City Success</span> <span><span lang="" about="/dashboard/philgoldstein6191" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">phil.goldstein_6191</span></span> <span>Wed, 10/09/2019 - 14:07</span> <div><p>What makes a smart city successful? There are likely as many answers out there as there are smart cities. </p> <p>There is no one-size-fits-all definition of a smart city, said Patricia Zullo, senior director of smart city solutions for <a href="https://enterprise.spectrum.com/" target="_blank">Spectrum Enterprise</a>, an arm of Charter Communications.</p> <p>“It’s unique at every place we go,” she said Wednesday, speaking at <a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/smart-cities-connect-2019">the Smart Cities Connect 2019 conference</a> at National Harbor, Md. <strong>“The definition and initiatives use cases are unique.”</strong></p> <p><a href="https://twitter.com/statetech" target="_blank"><em><strong>JOIN THE CONVERSATION: </strong>Follow @StateTech on Twitter for continued Smart Cities Connect 2019 conference coverage. </em></a></p> <p>Although every smart city approaches technology deployments and community engagement differently, experts speaking on two keynote session panels at the conference offered some concrete best practices for success. </p> <p>IT and civic leaders in smart cities shoul<strong>d focus on cultivating public-private partnerships </strong>to bring together a variety of stakeholders, they said. Additionally, city leaders should also impress upon technology vendor partners that they need to <strong>provide solutions that actually address the individual city’s challenges and needs</strong>. Cities need to <strong>prioritize what those needs are</strong>, and the technology capabilities they need to fulfill them. </p> <p>Speaking of smart cities, Aaron Deacon, managing director of Kansas City nonprofit <a href="https://www.kcdigitaldrive.org/about/" target="_blank">KC Digital Drive</a>, said that they “are kind of a new thing, kind of an old thing, and kind of the same thing we’ve been doing all along. You need relationships, structure, intentionality — <strong>and it all has to fit in with the larger vision for your city</strong>.”</p> <p>Here are three best practices that smart city experts discussed. </p> <p><a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/10/street-smarts-colorado-springs-moves-deliberately-toward-smart-city-future" target="_blank"><em><strong>MORE FROM STATETECH: </strong>Discover how Colorado Springs is taking its smart city journey. </em></a></p> <h2>1. Collaboration Is Key to Smart City Success</h2> <p>Zullo noted that cities that have been on a smart city journey for years now are only just starting to see the fruits of their labor when it comes to what they can do with the data they are collecting and how technology deployments can enhance economic development. </p> <p>Part of the issue is that, unlike other parts of the world, U.S. cities cannot be ordered, from the top down by a national government, to carry out smart city development in a specific way. </p> <p>“The U.S. in general is probably a little bit behind,” she said. It’s not for lack of trying or technology. It’s more because cities are run differently here than they are internationally. In order to get something accomplished, <strong>you need to prove something works and that you can get funding</strong>.”</p> <p>Mark Patton, vice president of smart cities for the <a href="https://www.columbuspartnership.com/" target="_blank">Columbus Partnership</a>, stressed that collaboration is key between the public sector, technology providers and academics. He also suggested that cities create one location where everyone involved with smart city projects convenes and works.</p> <p>With that kind of setup, he said, “you can’t go off after a tough meeting and say, ‘Those guys are a bunch of idiots.’ You have to work out the problems. <strong>Find a place to jam them all together and say, ‘Get to work.’</strong>” </p> <p>Zullo said public-private partnerships can cross departmental boundaries, help bring in private funding and work with the technology industry. Cities that have set up PPPs for smart city deployments are the ones that “have the most acceleration going on,” she said. </p> <p>Cities that just have a city manager, CIO or CTO working on smart city projects in his or her spare time won’t be successful, she argued. “There are too many shiny gadgets, and there’s too much going on in the city to be able to pull all this together,” she said. </p> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/author/phil-goldstein" hreflang="en"><img src="/sites/statetechmagazine.com/files/styles/face_small/public/people/CoMfravQ_400x400.jpg?itok=W9IAwS8L" width="58" height="58" alt="Phil Goldstein" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/author/phil-goldstein"> <div>Phil Goldstein</div> </a> <a target="_blank" class="twitter" href="https://twitter.com/intent/follow?region=follow_link&amp;screen_name=philgoldstein&amp;tw_p=followbutton&amp;variant=2.0"><span>Twitter</span></a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>Phil Goldstein is the web editor for <em>FedTech</em> and <em>StateTech</em>. Besides keeping up with the latest in technology trends, he is also an avid lover of the New York Yankees, poetry, photography, traveling and escaping humidity.</p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Wed, 09 Oct 2019 18:07:12 +0000 phil.goldstein_6191 42966 at https://statetechmagazine.com Smart Cities Connect 2019: FirstNet Empowers Public Safety, Say First Responders https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/10/smart-cities-connect-2019-firstnet-empowers-public-safety-say-first-responders <span>Smart Cities Connect 2019: FirstNet Empowers Public Safety, Say First Responders</span> <span><span lang="" about="/dashboard/mickey-mccarter" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mickey McCarter</span></span> <span>Tue, 10/08/2019 - 16:16</span> <div><p>Just as cities began the evolution toward becoming smart cities with synchronized traffic lights and SCADA systems, public safety agencies began to advance technologically when they moved past call boxes, said Bill Schrier, senior advisor at the <a href="https://www.firstnet.com/home" target="_blank">First Responder Network Authority</a>. But <strong>police, fire and emergency medical service agencies</strong> are embracing a whole new level of technological innovation recently.</p> <p>Speaking Tuesday at the <a href="https://fall.smartcitiesconnect.org/" target="_blank">Smart Cities Connect 2019 conference</a> outside Washington, D.C, first responders described some of the innovations that are helping them <strong>combat crime and save lives</strong>, thanks in part due to the dedicated broadband access provided by the First Responder Network Authority (FirstNet).</p> <p>Retired Brig. Gen. Welton Chase Jr. of FirstNet described the first responder network: “FirstNet is a state-of-the-art, nationwide, <strong>interoperable broadband network</strong> that is able to transcend jurisdictional boundaries.”</p> <p>Working across jurisdictions was a critical aspect in the establishment of FirstNet after first responders were unable to establish interagency communications when <strong>responding to the 9/11 terrorist attacks</strong>, Chase said.</p> <p><a href="https://www.firstnet.com/ecms/dam/att/firstnet/marketing/pdf/firstnet-sub-paid-brochure.pdf" target="_blank">Representing the FirstNet contractor</a>, Matt Walsh, area vice president for business development, <a href="https://www.cdw.com/search/?key=at+T&amp;ctlgfilter=&amp;searchscope=all&amp;sr=1&amp;ln=0&amp;b=AWS" target="_blank">AT&amp;T</a> IoT Solutions, pointed to the ability of drones <strong>to collect information and share it</strong> to multiple agencies during major events. “It’s almost like a Webex, where you can provide anyone with a login and they can stream that information via FirstNet to see what’s going on,” Walsh said.</p> <p><a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/09/firstnets-new-roadmap-previews-future-public-safety-network"><em><strong>MORE FROM STATETECH: </strong>FirstNet's Roadmap Specifies Future of First Responder Network</em></a></p> <h2>Chicago Decentralizes Command, Provides Mobile Power to Officers</h2> <p>Jonathan Lewin, chief of the technical services bureau for the <a href="https://home.chicagopolice.org/" target="_blank">Chicago Police Department</a>, described the fusion centers that have helped his department gain a centralized view of crime throughout Chicago. Known as <strong>Strategic Decision Support Centers</strong>, the facilities put command and control where required around key locations in Chicago. The department also is expanding a mobility program with hopes to provide every officer with a smartphone in 2020.</p> <p>The Chicago Police Department serves 2.7 million people across 234 square miles, Lewin said. With 22 districts and 13,200 officers, it’s the <strong>second-largest police department</strong> in the United States.</p> <p><a href="https://urbanlabs.uchicago.edu/projects/strategic-decision-support-centers" target="_blank">The SDSCs integrate</a> “operational intelligence from existing sources,” including a geospatial information system, crime forecasting and gunshot detection sensors, according to Lewin. The centers also provide access to the city’s surveillance camera network and license plate readers, both fixed and mobile. Using data collected by the system and other factors as input, <strong>police determine where to deploy</strong> their resources and assets and where to station officers.</p> <p>The <a href="https://www.cdw.com/content/cdw/en/brand/samsung-interstitial.html" target="_blank">Samsung</a> smartphones provided to officers also receive this information, and <strong>officers in the field file reports</strong> collected by the SDSCs. “The ultimate goal of the SDSCs is to provide a process and an environment for collaboration and analysis resulting in fewer victims,” according to Lewin.</p> <p>“Mobility is really important to us,” Lewin said. “The officers like being able to get all of this <strong>information at their fingertips</strong>.”</p> <p>To facilitate that mobility and to save money, Chicago is equipping every officer with <strong>a Samsung mobile phone</strong>. “<a href="https://news.samsung.com/us/samsung-dex-in-vehicle-pilot-chicago-police-department/" target="_blank">The smartphone becomes the compute power</a> not only when they are on the street but also in the car,” Lewin added. Officers also will receive docking stations at their desks, so the phones will become their computers in every sense.</p> <p>Lewin anticipates this mobility, powered by the <strong>Samsung Desktop Experience (known as Samsung DeX)</strong>, will save the police department thousands of dollars per car across 3,500 cars in the force.</p> <p><em><a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/09/chicago-pd-partners-samsung-give-officers-more-apps-street"><strong>MORE FROM STATETECH: </strong>Chicago partners with Samsung to empower officers with apps</a></em></p> <h2>Washington, D.C., Prioritizes Medical Services in Emergency Response</h2> <p>Gregory Dean, chief of the <a href="https://dc.gov/agency/fire-and-emergency-medical-services-department" target="_blank">Washington D.C. Fire and Emergency Medical Services Department,</a> meets a lot of demands protecting residents, workers and visitors to Washington, D.C. Washington has <strong>700,000 residents</strong>, and the number of people in the city swells to number 1.5 million during any business day. The city must also handle large official events and protests.</p> <p>At Smart Cities Connect, the chief described how tech advancements were helping his department to save lives. Prioritizing cases is important because the city has <strong>a limited number of hospitals</strong>, the chief said. It’s not unusual for the EMS service to spend 45 minutes at a hospital with a patient on a stretcher because of a lack of resources. </p> <p>“Where are we in relationship to the resources when it comes to EMS?” Dean said, describing the challenge his department strives to tackle. Washington has established <strong>a triage line as part of the 911 emergency call center</strong>, where <a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/public-safety/nurses-in-dcs-911-center-are-helping-cut-some-unnecessary-ambulance-runs-but-not-most/2018/09/23/72b4e388-b3dd-11e8-aed9-001309990777_story.html" target="_blank">a nurse can determine</a> the severity of a medical emergency and route a patient to a specific health center, sometimes via a ride-hailing service rather than ambulance.</p> <p>The city’s medical services took specific steps to tackle a high rate of death due to cardiac arrest, the chief said: The fire department trained <strong>70,000 citizens in CPR</strong> over the past 3.5 years, and residents at risk of cardiac attack can obtain <a href="https://fems.dc.gov/vi/node/1284381" target="_blank">an app called PulsePoint</a> that will send an alert when a medical emergency occurs.</p> <p><em>Read more articles from </em>StateTech<em>’s coverage of the Smart Cities Connect 2019 conference <a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/smart-cities-connect-2019">here</a>.</em></p> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/taxonomy/term/11391" hreflang="en"><img src="/sites/statetechmagazine.com/files/styles/face_small/public/people/Mickey_McCarter.jpg?itok=tWzGOlTU" width="58" height="58" alt="Mickey McCarter" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/taxonomy/term/11391"> <div>Mickey McCarter</div> </a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>Mickey McCarter is the senior editor of StateTech Magazine.</p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Tue, 08 Oct 2019 20:16:21 +0000 Mickey McCarter 42961 at https://statetechmagazine.com Smart Cities Connect 2019: How to Make Smart Transportation a Success https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/10/smart-cities-connect-2019-how-make-smart-transportation-success <span>Smart Cities Connect 2019: How to Make Smart Transportation a Success</span> <span><span lang="" about="/dashboard/philgoldstein6191" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">phil.goldstein_6191</span></span> <span>Tue, 10/08/2019 - 13:41</span> <div><p>The dream vision of <strong>smart transportation and urban mobility projects</strong> is to have autonomous vehicles connecting to and constantly communicating with sensors placed around a city and its surrounding region, moving traffic more efficiently and safely. </p> <p>Most smart cities are still in the very early stages of that journey. Speaking Tuesday at the <a href="https://fall.smartcitiesconnect.org/" target="_blank">Smart Cities Connect 2019 conference</a> at National Harbor, Md., transportation and smart city officials from a range of cities across the country said that for smart mobility projects to be successful, <strong>cities need to build and leverage underlying infrastructure and data sets</strong>.</p> <p><a href="https://www.linkedin.com/in/jordan-davis-96116310/" target="_blank">Jordan Davis</a>, director of Smart Columbus at the <a href="https://www.columbuspartnership.com/" target="_blank">Columbus Partnership</a>, said that <strong>“the connected vehicle environment will be the new normal” </strong>and that the goal is to figure out how to not just pilot such programs but scale them, not just in cities but in the surrounding region. </p> <p><a href="https://twitter.com/statetech" target="_blank"><em><strong>JOIN THE CONVERSATION: </strong>Follow @StateTech on Twitter for continued Smart Cities Connect 2019 conference coverage. </em></a></p> <h2 id="toc_0">Columbus Builds a Data Platform for Smart Transportation</h2> <p>Columbus, Ohio, is a hotbed of smart city activity, and it’s <a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2018/10/8-smart-cities-watch">made a name </a>for itself with its burgeoning s<a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2018/08/columbus-details-tech-needed-its-connected-vehicle-project">mart transportation programs</a>. Three years ago, the Ohio city won the highly publicized <a href="https://www.transportation.gov/smartcity" target="_blank">Smart City Challenge</a>, a nationwide contest put on by the U.S. Department of Transportation, which came with a <strong>$40 million</strong> grant.</p> <p>The core of the city’s efforts is the <a href="https://www.smartcolumbusos.com/" target="_blank">Smart Columbus OS</a>, <strong>a data management platform </strong>Columbus built from the ground up with modern architecture, Davis said. Data is the backbone of the OS, which serves as an integrated data exchange that combines public- and private-sector data. </p> <p>The OS is designed to be used by others in the region, support the data ingestion needs of the U.S. DOT grant projects and facilitate agency efficiency for city governments, Davis said. The goal is to <strong>create a viable regional data platform and pull in data from across the region</strong>. Columbus wants to scale and sustain the platform to finance continued investment in smart city projects. </p> <p>“It’s built for the world of IoT in cities,” Davis said. “So you can agnostically manage all of the real-time data in the city.”</p> <p>Columbus is investing in some building blocks that are “no-regret bets,” like electric grid modernization, installing electric car charging stations and creating a connected vehicle environment across <strong>179 intersections and 4,200 cars, trucks, and buses</strong>, which the city anticipates will be connected in the region by 2020. </p> <p>In addition to pilot projects like a self-driving shuttle, Columbus has invested in a culture shift to make smart transportation reality, Davis said. That includes aggressive electric vehicle adoption for the public and private sectors, creating simple and integrated solutions, and adding different modes of transportation beyond personal vehicles. </p> <p><a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2017/12/intelligent-transportation-systems-save-cents-main-street" target="_blank"><em><strong>MORE FROM STATETECH: </strong>Find out how intelligent transportation systems save cities money.</em></a></p> <h2 id="toc_1">Cities Can Use Existing Infrastructure for Transportation Projects</h2> <p>Officials at the conference emphasized that they plan to use existing network and physical infrastructure to make their transportation systems smarter. </p> <p><a href="https://www.linkedin.com/in/tarareel/" target="_blank">Tara Reel</a>, transportation and transit planner for the city of Virginia Beach, noted that the city is where five transatlantic communications cables connect to the mainland United States. The city wants to <strong>use a ring of dark fiber to enhance its smart transportation projects</strong>.</p> <p>That includes connected vehicles, mobility applications and vehicle-to-infrastructure communication. Virginia Beach wants to make efficient use of existing infrastructure, alleviate traffic congestion and<strong> deliver real-time information to drivers</strong>, such as road closure and work zone alerts. </p> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/author/phil-goldstein" hreflang="en"><img src="/sites/statetechmagazine.com/files/styles/face_small/public/people/CoMfravQ_400x400.jpg?itok=W9IAwS8L" width="58" height="58" alt="Phil Goldstein" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/author/phil-goldstein"> <div>Phil Goldstein</div> </a> <a target="_blank" class="twitter" href="https://twitter.com/intent/follow?region=follow_link&amp;screen_name=philgoldstein&amp;tw_p=followbutton&amp;variant=2.0"><span>Twitter</span></a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>Phil Goldstein is the web editor for <em>FedTech</em> and <em>StateTech</em>. Besides keeping up with the latest in technology trends, he is also an avid lover of the New York Yankees, poetry, photography, traveling and escaping humidity.</p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Tue, 08 Oct 2019 17:41:59 +0000 phil.goldstein_6191 42956 at https://statetechmagazine.com Smart Cities Connect 2019 https://statetechmagazine.com/smart-cities-connect-2019 <span>Smart Cities Connect 2019</span> <span><span lang="" about="/dashboard/philgoldstein6191" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">phil.goldstein_6191</span></span> <span>Tue, 10/08/2019 - 13:26</span> <div><p>Join <em>StateTech</em> as we cover the Smart Cities Connect 2019 conference from Oct. 8-10 in National Harbor, Md. </p> </div> <div> <div>Event Image Toggle</div> <div>Off</div> </div> <div class="pw-widget pw-size-medium pw-layout-vertical" data-layout="vertical" data-url="https://statetechmagazine.com/smart-cities-connect-2019" data-title="Smart Cities Connect 2019" data-via="StateTech" data-button-background="none"> <span> <span>Oct</span> <span>08</span> <span>2019</span> </span> <a class="pw-button-twitter cdw-taboola-social"></a> <a class="pw-button-facebook cdw-taboola-social"></a> <a class="pw-button-linkedin cdw-taboola-social"></a> <a class="pw-button-reddit cdw-taboola-social"></a> <a class="pw-button-flipboard cdw-taboola-social"></a> <a class="pw-button-email cdw-taboola-social"></a> <!-- Pinterest button is in EdTechk12 theme's vertical template --> </div> <div class="pw-widget pw-size-medium pw-layout-horizontal" data-counter="true" data-url="https://statetechmagazine.com/smart-cities-connect-2019" data-title="Smart Cities Connect 2019" data-via="StateTech" data-button-background="none"> <div> <a class="pw-button-twitter cdw-taboola-social"></a> <a href="https://twitter.com/search?f=realtime&amp;q=https%3A%2F%2Fstatetechmagazine.com%2Frss.xml%3Fitok%3DmQbgvt0X%26destination%3D%2F%253Fitok%253DmQbgvt0X%26_exception_statuscode%3D404" target="_blank"><span class="pw-box-counter cdw-taboola" data-channel="twitter"></span></a> </div> <div> <a class="pw-button-facebook cdw-taboola-social"></a> </div> <div> <a class="pw-button-linkedin cdw-taboola-social"></a> </div> <div> <a class="pw-button-reddit cdw-taboola-social"></a> </div> <div> <a class="pw-button-flipboard cdw-taboola-social"></a> </div> <div> <a class="pw-button-email cdw-taboola-social"></a> </div> <!-- Pinterest button is in EdTechk12 theme's horizontal template --> </div> <div class="pw-widget pw-size-medium pw-layout-horizontal" data-url="https://statetechmagazine.com/smart-cities-connect-2019" data-title="Smart Cities Connect 2019" data-via="StateTech" data-button-background="none"> <div> <a class="pw-button-twitter"></a> <span class="pw-box-counter" pw:channel="twitter"></span> </div> <div> <a class="pw-button-facebook"></a> <span class="pw-box-counter" pw:channel="facebook"></span> </div> </div> Tue, 08 Oct 2019 17:26:08 +0000 phil.goldstein_6191 42951 at https://statetechmagazine.com Street Smarts: Colorado Springs Moves Deliberately Toward a Smart City Future https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/10/street-smarts-colorado-springs-moves-deliberately-toward-smart-city-future <span>Street Smarts: Colorado Springs Moves Deliberately Toward a Smart City Future</span> <span><span lang="" about="/dashboard/mickey-mccarter" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">Mickey McCarter</span></span> <span>Mon, 10/07/2019 - 13:05</span> <div><p><em>Editor's Note: This is the second article in "Street Smarts," which will be an ongoing </em>StateTech <em>series that highlights local stories of smart city projects, from development to execution. Check out <a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/09/street-smarts-montgomery-ala-embraces-internet-things">the first article in the series on Montgomery, Ala.</a></em></p> <p>Known as Olympic City USA, Colorado Springs is the second-largest city in Colorado. Following in the footsteps of the state’s largest city, Denver, Colorado Springs is undertaking <strong>a wide-ranging smart city project known as SmartCOS</strong> to improve daily life for its residents and businesses.</p> <p>“The city of Colorado Springs recognizes that future city life will require leveraging technology and innovation to improve the experience of people living in and visiting our city,” says Bret Waters, deputy chief of staff for Colorado Springs. “As the world becomes more technologically driven, we have <a href="https://coloradosprings.gov/smartcos" target="_blank">the opportunity with our SmartCOS program</a> <strong>to test and utilize emerging technologies</strong> to improve public services.” </p> <h2>Transparency Moved the Conversation Forward </h2> <p>From the beginning, Colorado Springs officials wanted <strong>their smart city initiative</strong> to be transparent and inclusive. As such, the city sought <a href="https://coloradosprings.gov/sites/default/files/inline-images/smartcos_strategy_final.pdf" target="_blank">input from as many stakeholders</a> as possible, including the mayor, the city council, its municipal utilities board, local businesses, residents and more. One of the first steps was to hire a consultant to help educate not only city staff but the broader community on the benefits of smart cities and what some of the emerging technologies are.</p> <p>“We wanted as much input as we could get up front. As we roll out these projects either in pilot phase or scale these projects across the city, that will increase the chances of <strong>those projects being successful</strong> when we have input from the community,” says Ryan Trujillo, innovation and sustainability manager for Colorado Springs. </p> <p>While the process certainly hasn’t moved as quickly as it could have, <strong>that has been by design</strong>.</p> <p>“Our intent is to take a ‘crawl, walk, run’ approach, and we've taken a significant amount of time <strong>developing strategies and getting that stakeholder alignment</strong>, so that if we do get to a point where we can justify a return on investment for a scalable project, the community is not hearing it for the first time when we get to that point,” Trujillo says.</p> <p><em><a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/09/street-smarts-montgomery-ala-embraces-internet-things" target="_blank"><strong>MORE FROM STATETECH: </strong>Montgomery, Ala., embraces the Internet of Things on its journey to becoming a smart city.</a></em></p> <h2>Olympics Museum Opened the Door to a Pilot Program</h2> <p>In 2018, the planned redevelopment of the <strong>Southwest Downtown area</strong> in conjunction with <a href="https://coloradospringschamberedc.com/smart-cos/" target="_blank">an Olympic museum currently under construction</a> presented Colorado Springs with an opportunity to not only upgrade a previously blighted area but to establish a test bed of sorts for smart city technologies.</p> <p>“We’ve identified that as our pilot area, where we want to <strong>showcase various technologies</strong> in that relatively confined space to prove out any type of return on investment, if there is any — to prove the use cases and further engage our public with the hopes of scaling those projects across the city where it makes sense,” Trujillo says.</p> <p>The Southwest Downtown project redevelopment is currently underway, with much of the streetscape and right-of-way construction to be completed in <strong>the first and second quarters of 2020</strong>. A variety of smart city deployments will either be completed at the same time or shortly thereafter.</p> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/author/derek-rice" hreflang="en"><img src="/sites/statetechmagazine.com/files/styles/face_small/public/people/DerekRice.jpeg.jpg?itok=Mcbyl2mi" width="58" height="58" alt="Derek Rice " typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/author/derek-rice"> <div>Derek Rice</div> </a> <a target="_blank" class="twitter" href="https://twitter.com/intent/follow?region=follow_link&amp;screen_name=derekjrice&amp;tw_p=followbutton&amp;variant=2.0"><span>Twitter</span></a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>Derek Rice is a freelance writer and content developer who lives in Kennebunk, Maine.</p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Mon, 07 Oct 2019 17:05:00 +0000 Mickey McCarter 42946 at https://statetechmagazine.com What Is the Future of Facial Recognition Technology? https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/10/what-future-facial-recognition-technology <span>What Is the Future of Facial Recognition Technology?</span> <span><span lang="" about="/dashboard/philgoldstein6191" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">phil.goldstein_6191</span></span> <span>Mon, 10/07/2019 - 10:55</span> <div><p>When and how should police departments and other public safety agencies use facial recognition technology? Should they do so at all? These questions are being <strong>more hotly debated in the country than perhaps ever before</strong>. </p> <p>Police departments say that facial recognition solutions allow them to <strong>pursue investigations of criminal suspects with greater efficiency and are just one tool in a toolbox</strong>. Civil libertarians have pushed back, arguing that public safety agencies <strong>overuse the technology and that it can lead to the arrest of innocent individuals</strong>. </p> <p>Some city governments and police departments have recently taken steps to recalibrate their facial recognition policies to strike a greater balance between the two sides of the debate. </p> <p>These efforts indicate that there are ways to<strong> effectively use facial recognition solutions while balancing privacy concerns</strong>. </p> <p><a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/07/how-public-safety-and-traffic-management-agencies-use-video-wall-technology-perfcon" target="_blank"><em><strong>MORE FROM STATETECH:</strong> Discover how public safety agencies use video wall technology.</em></a></p> <h2 id="toc_0">The Debate Churns Over Police Use of Facial Recognition Tech</h2> <p>In September, California lawmakers voted to <strong>temporarily ban the use of facial recognition technology in law enforcement body cameras</strong>.</p> <p><a href="https://www.cnn.com/2019/09/12/tech/california-body-cam-facial-recognition-ban/index.html" target="_blank">As CNN reports</a>, the legislation, known as the Body Camera Accountability Act, sits with California Gov. Gavin Newsom, who must decide whether or not to sign it into law by Oct. 13. If he does, the law would go into effect in January.</p> <p><a href="https://www.washingtonpost.com/technology/2019/09/12/california-could-become-largest-state-ban-facial-recognition-body-cameras/" target="_blank"><em>The Washington Post</em> reports</a> that the “ban has earned praise from privacy and civil rights advocates, who have long argued that the technology could be deployed for mass surveillance and lead to more false arrests.”</p> <p>The California action comes as a coalition of activist groups representing more than <strong>15 million</strong> combined members under the umbrella group <a href="https://www.banfacialrecognition.com/" target="_blank">Fight for the Future</a> is pushing for a federal ban on law enforcement’s use of facial recognition technology. Three cities — San Francisco and Oakland, Calif., and Somerville, Mass. — have banned the technology so far. </p> <p>However, despite these actions, <a href="https://www.pewinternet.org/2019/09/05/more-than-half-of-u-s-adults-trust-law-enforcement-to-use-facial-recognition-responsibly/" target="_blank">a Pew Research Center survey</a> finds that <strong>a majority of Americans (56 percent) </strong>trust law enforcement agencies to use these technologies responsibly. </p> <p>Further, the survey found that <strong>59 percent </strong>say it is “acceptable for law enforcement to use facial recognition tools to assess security threats in public spaces,” according to Pew. Notably, acceptance of the technology for law enforcement does not extend to other areas. In terms of its responsible use, technology companies and advertisers only received support from 36 percent and 18 percent of respondents in the survey, respectively.</p> <p><a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/05/chicago-police-tap-more-video-sources-help-solve-crimes" target="_blank"><em><strong>MORE FROM STATETECH: </strong>Find out how the Chicago Police Department is tapping more video sources to solve crimes. </em></a></p> <h2 id="toc_1">Police Departments Seek to Use Facial Recognition Tools Responsibly</h2> <p>How are police departments using facial recognition tools today? Lt. Derek Sabatini of the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department <a href="https://www.npr.org/2019/07/10/740480966/the-debate-over-facial-recognition-technologys-role-in-law-enforcement" target="_blank">tells NPR</a> that the technology is an investigative tool. </p> <p>The department <strong>takes still images from crime scenes and compares them to a database of booking photos</strong>. </p> <p>“So, we take crime scene images and compare them to criminals in order to develop leads,” he says. “And one of the other things that people also mistake is identification. You’ll hear it used all the time, about, ‘Well, the facial recognition, it identifies individuals.’ It doesn't identify anybody. <strong>It's an investigative lead</strong>.”</p> <p>City governments and police departments have taken steps to limit the use of facial recognition. In 2017, the Metropolitan Council of Nashville and Davidson County <a href="https://www.nashville.gov/mc/ordinances/term_2015_2019/bl2017_646.htm" target="_blank">passed an ordinance requiring</a> council approval before deploying facial recognition tools via commercial agreements. </p> <p>In August, the Detroit Police Department adopted a proposal that puts limits on how the agency can use facial recognition software. The tools can only be used on still images of criminal suspects linked to serious crimes, such as homicide and armed robbery, <a target="_blank">according to the plan</a>. “<strong>It prohibits using the software to scan faces in real time,</strong> though the technology the department has is capable of doing that,” <a href="https://www.michiganradio.org/post/detroit-police-revise-facial-recognition-policy-civil-rights-groups-call-ban" target="_blank">Michigan Radio reports</a>. </p> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/taxonomy/term/11301" hreflang="en"><img src="/sites/statetechmagazine.com/files/styles/face_small/public/people/admin-houstonthomas.png.jpg?itok=xC3034eh" width="58" height="58" alt="Houston Thomas III" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/taxonomy/term/11301"> <div>Houston Thomas III</div> </a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>In his role as Senior Business Development Strategist and Public Safety Senior Strategist, Houston Thomas III manages the architect and engineering process for large-scale integration projects involving public safety agencies. He provides subject matter expertise to CDW•G law enforcement customers with respect to digital intelligence and evidence management.</p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Mon, 07 Oct 2019 14:55:56 +0000 phil.goldstein_6191 42941 at https://statetechmagazine.com Anti-Phishing Best Practices for State and Local Governments https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/10/anti-phishing-best-practices-state-and-local-governments <span>Anti-Phishing Best Practices for State and Local Governments</span> <span><span lang="" about="/dashboard/philgoldstein6191" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">phil.goldstein_6191</span></span> <span>Thu, 10/03/2019 - 11:44</span> <div><p>Phishing remains the leading cause of data breaches. Bogus emails that con or coerce users into disclosing key personal data are responsible for the vast majority of successful cyberattacks across the public and private sectors.</p> <p>While education has helped slow the rate of successful phishing attempts, there are still gaps where the misleading messages can get through. One thing to think about during <a href="https://www.dhs.gov/national-cyber-security-awareness-month" target="_blank">National Cybersecurity Awareness Month</a>, which kicked off Oct. 1:<strong> About 18 percent</strong> of those who clicked on test phishing links in 2018 were on mobile devices, according to Verizon’s “<a href="https://enterprise.verizon.com/resources/executivebriefs/2019-dbir-executive-brief-emea.pdf" target="_blank">2019 Data Breach Investigations Report</a>,” which says that mobile users can be more susceptible to phishing.</p> <p>State government is not immune. <strong>Twenty-seven percent </strong>of state IT leaders view this kind of attack as the most prevalent threat to their systems, <a href="https://www.nascio.org/Portals/0/Publications/Documents/2018/2018DeloitteNASCIOCybersecurityStudyfinal.pdf" target="_blank">according to a 2018 survey by Deloitte and the National Association of State Chief Information Officers</a>. Another <strong>35 percent </strong>were most worried about ransomware, which can either be the result of a phishing attack (compromised credentials enable hackers to invade systems) or may be embedded within the actual phishing message. Taken together, this puts phishing front and center as a state concern.</p> <p><strong>“State government is a high-profile target for these kinds of attacks,”</strong> says <a href="https://www.thecaap.org/news-events/symposiums/2019-symposium-videos/terrill-frantz-video.html" target="_blank">Terrill Frantz</a>, an associate professor leading the cybersecurity management and operations degree program at Harrisburg University of Science and Technology.</p> <p>“People want to<strong> go where the money is</strong>. Or, if they are trying to make a point, then <strong>they want the bragging rights. </strong>That means state government will get a lot of attention from people looking to carry out these kinds of attacks,” he says. “More than just getting paid, through a ransomware attack, for example, people go after state government as a way to make a name for themselves.”</p> <p>The Deloitte/NASCIO study points to a number of hurdles that keep states from effectively addressing phishing. These include a lack of sufficient cybersecurity budget, inadequate cyber staffing and the increasing sophistication of the cyber threat.</p> <p>Despite these challenges, states have the means to address the phishing peril. With a combination of<strong> technical tools and sophisticated training,</strong> it is possible to significantly limit the chances of a successful attack.</p> <p><em><a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/cdw_insider_registration/register-web?magazine=" target="_blank"><b>SUBSCRIBE: </b>Become an Insider and get curated cybersecurity news, tactics and analysis — for free.</a></em></p> <h2 id="toc_0">Follow These Steps to Help Prevent Phishing Attacks</h2> <p><strong>Make it easy. </strong>To effectively combat phishing, state workers need to be empowered to take direct and concrete action. Government employees are more apt to flag suspect emails when the process for doing so is simple and streamlined. For example, Illinois implemented a phishing alert button, which is embedded into all incoming emails. If an employee spots a suspect email, a simple click is all that is needed to alert a dedicated security monitoring team, triggering incident response for follow-up and monitoring.</p> <p><strong>Make it personal. </strong>“For the end user, there is no perceived consequence to getting this wrong,” Alex Grohmann, a director on the <a href="https://www.issa.org/" target="_blank">Information Systems Security Association</a>’s international board. To convince employees of the urgency of phishing prevention, IT needs to make it personal. “This is not just about the company or the institution being at risk; these practices protect them as individuals. This is something that could happen to them personally. They can be compromised at home and there’s no IT department to ride in and save you. When they understand that there can be personal consequences in this, they will be more likely to use good hygiene.”</p> <p><strong>Set effective limits.</strong> Email filtering tools can help prevent phishing; for example, by rejecting messages that contain suspicious links. But there’s a downside. </p> <p>“You can only ratchet up those tools to a certain level before you start to impact business operations, before you start blocking legitimate emails that maybe are time sensitive,” Grohmann says. “So, you have to do an ongoing balancing act. If you are doing business with a particular vendor or partner, for instance, you can have the IT department set up a secure mailbox so those messages get through. It takes time and effort, but it may be necessary in order to set effective limits that don’t interrupt your operations.”</p> <p><a href="https://statetechmagazine.com/article/2019/08/how-defeat-latest-state-and-local-government-cybercrime-trends" target="_blank"><em><strong>MORE FROM STATETECH: </strong>Find out how to combat the latets cybercrime trends. </em></a></p> <h2 id="toc_0">Employees Respond Best to Realistic Anti-Phishing Training</h2> <p>Despite all preventive measures, there’s a good chance some phishing act will succeed, so assume the worst. With this in mind, it makes sense to organize systems around damage control, with<strong> role-based controls and network architecture</strong> all geared toward limiting an intruder’s access. </p> <p>“Machines should be isolated in their own networks. <strong>People should have the least amount of access needed to do their jobs,</strong>” says Shane Chagpar, a solution designer and instructor with IT consultancy<a href="https://www.kepner-tregoe.com/knowledge-center/authors/shane-chagpar/" target="_blank"> Kepner-Tregoe</a>. “The person in marketing shouldn’t be able to view and edit reports from the financial side. Or they should only be able to view certain reports. You have to be granular in how you grant access.”</p> <p>Phishing schemes are psychological in approach: <strong>The scammers know that people who are stressed, hurried or under pressure</strong> are more likely to respond to an urgent-sounding message. One key way to stop the clicks is to build a friendlier, less harried workplace. </p> <p>“Pressure and stresses lead to people clicking on emails,” says Daniel Norman, a research analyst with the <a href="https://www.securityforum.org/" target="_blank">Information Security Forum</a>. “So, if you can reduce the stress and reduce the pressure, if you can create a more positive work environment, that is actually going to reduce the likelihood of people clicking on phishing emails.”</p> <p>Anti-phishing awareness doesn’t come from a PowerPoint deck. It comes from <strong>hands-on, realistic exercises</strong>. </p> <p>“You might have a Bed Bath &amp; Beyond coupon that looks very real. Or you put things in the email that make people mad: ‘Click here to see pictures of your spouse with someone else,’” says Bruce Beam, CIO of <a href="https://www.isc2.org/" target="_blank">(ISC)<sup>2</sup></a>, a nonprofit membership association of certified cybersecurity professionals. “If people are going to learn, the training has to be realistic. It has to be convincing.”</p> </div> <div> <div class="field-author"> <div id="taxonomy-term-" class=""> <div class="author-photo"> <a href="/taxonomy/term/11711" hreflang="en"><img src="/sites/statetechmagazine.com/files/styles/face_small/public/people/AdamStone2_0.jpg?itok=cCl1Z1mX" width="58" height="58" alt="Adam Stone" typeof="foaf:Image" /> </a> </div> <div class="author-info"> <span>by </span><a rel="author" href="/taxonomy/term/11711"> <div>Adam Stone </div> </a> </div> <div class="author-bio"> <p> <div><p>Adam Stone writes on technology trends from Annapolis, Md., with a focus on government IT, military and first-responder technologies.</p> </div> </p> </div> </div> </div> </div> Thu, 03 Oct 2019 15:44:15 +0000 phil.goldstein_6191 42936 at https://statetechmagazine.com Fall 2019 https://statetechmagazine.com/magazine/issue/2019/10/fall-2019 <span>Fall 2019</span> <span><span lang="" about="/dashboard/philgoldstein6191" typeof="schema:Person" property="schema:name" datatype="">phil.goldstein_6191</span></span> <span>Wed, 10/02/2019 - 09:22</span> <div class="pw-widget pw-size-medium pw-layout-vertical" data-layout="vertical" data-url="https://statetechmagazine.com/magazine/issue/2019/10/fall-2019" data-title="Fall 2019" data-via="StateTech" data-button-background="none"> <span> <span>Oct</span> <span>02</span> <span>2019</span> </span> <a class="pw-button-twitter cdw-taboola-social"></a> <a class="pw-button-facebook cdw-taboola-social"></a> <a class="pw-button-linkedin cdw-taboola-social"></a> <a class="pw-button-reddit cdw-taboola-social"></a> <a class="pw-button-flipboard cdw-taboola-social"></a> <a class="pw-button-email cdw-taboola-social"></a> <!-- Pinterest button is in EdTechk12 theme's vertical template --> </div> <div class="pw-widget pw-size-medium pw-layout-horizontal" data-counter="true" data-url="https://statetechmagazine.com/magazine/issue/2019/10/fall-2019" data-title="Fall 2019" data-via="StateTech" data-button-background="none"> <div> <a class="pw-button-twitter cdw-taboola-social"></a> <a href="https://twitter.com/search?f=realtime&amp;q=https%3A%2F%2Fstatetechmagazine.com%2Frss.xml%3Fitok%3DmQbgvt0X%26destination%3D%2F%253Fitok%253DmQbgvt0X%26_exception_statuscode%3D404" target="_blank"><span class="pw-box-counter cdw-taboola" data-channel="twitter"></span></a> </div> <div> <a class="pw-button-facebook cdw-taboola-social"></a> </div> <div> <a class="pw-button-linkedin cdw-taboola-social"></a> </div> <div> <a class="pw-button-reddit cdw-taboola-social"></a> </div> <div> <a class="pw-button-flipboard cdw-taboola-social"></a> </div> <div> <a class="pw-button-email cdw-taboola-social"></a> </div> <!-- Pinterest button is in EdTechk12 theme's horizontal template --> </div> <div class="pw-widget pw-size-medium pw-layout-horizontal" data-url="https://statetechmagazine.com/magazine/issue/2019/10/fall-2019" data-title="Fall 2019" data-via="StateTech" data-button-background="none"> <div> <a class="pw-button-twitter"></a> <span class="pw-box-counter" pw:channel="twitter"></span> </div> <div> <a class="pw-button-facebook"></a> <span class="pw-box-counter" pw:channel="facebook"></span> </div> </div> Wed, 02 Oct 2019 13:22:55 +0000 phil.goldstein_6191 42931 at https://statetechmagazine.com